U.S. Code of Federal Regulations

Regulations most recently checked for updates: Apr 24, 2024

§ 40.61 - What are the preliminary steps in the drug testing collection process?

As the collector, you must take the following steps before actually beginning a collection:

(a) When a specific time for an employee's test has been scheduled, or the collection site is at the employee's work site, and the employee does not appear at the collection site at the scheduled time, contact the DER to determine the appropriate interval within which the DER has determined the employee is authorized to arrive. If the employee's arrival is delayed beyond that time, you must notify the DER that the employee has not reported for testing, the DER must determine whether the employee has refused to test (see §§ 40.191(a)(1) and 40.355(i)). In a situation where a C/TPA has notified an owner/operator or other individual employee to report for testing (other than for a pre-employment test) and the employee does not appear, the C/TPA must determine whether the employee has refused to test (see §§ 40.191(a)(1) and 40.355(j)).

(b) Ensure that, when the employee enters the collection site, you begin the testing process without undue delay. For example, you must not wait because the employee says he or she is not ready or is unable to urinate or because an authorized employer or employee representative is delayed in arriving.

(1) If the employee is also going to take a DOT alcohol test, you must ensure, to the greatest extent practicable, that the alcohol test is completed before the drug testing collection process begins.

Example to paragraph (b)(1):An employee enters the test site for both a drug and an alcohol test. Normally, the collector would wait until the BAT had completed the alcohol test process before beginning the drug test process. However, there are some situations in which an exception to this normal practice would be reasonable. One such situation might be if several people were waiting for the BAT to conduct alcohol tests, but a drug testing collector in the same facility were free. Someone waiting might be able to complete a drug test without unduly delaying his or her alcohol test. Collectors and BATs should work together, however, to ensure that post-accident and reasonable suspicion alcohol tests happen as soon as possible (e.g., by moving the employee to the head of the line for alcohol tests).

(2) If the employee needs medical attention (e.g., an injured employee in an emergency medical facility who is required to have a post-accident test), do not delay this treatment to collect a specimen.

(3) You must not collect a specimen from an unconscious employee to conduct a drug test under this part.

(4) You must not catheterize a conscious employee for purposes of a urine test. However, you must inform an employee who normally voids through self-catheterization that the employee is required to provide a specimen in that manner. If an employee normally voids through self-catheterization, but declines to do so for the urine test, the collector should notify the DER of the circumstances, so that the actual employer can determine whether the situation constitutes a refusal to test by the employee.

(c) Require the employee to provide positive identification. You must see a photo ID issued by the employer (other than in the case of an owner-operator or other self-employed individual) or a Federal, state, or local government (e.g., a driver's license). You may not accept faxes or photocopies of identification. Positive identification by an employer representative (not a co-worker or another employee being tested) is also acceptable. If the employee cannot produce positive identification, you must contact a DER to verify the identity of the employee.

(d) If the employee asks, provide your identification to the employee. Your identification must include your name and your employer's name, but does not have to include your picture, address, or telephone number.

(e) Explain the basic collection procedure to the employee, and notify the employee that instructions for completing the CCF can be found at the HHS (https://www.samhsa.gov/workplace) and DOT (https://www.transportation.gov/odapc) websites.

(f) Direct the employee to remove outer clothing (e.g., coveralls, jacket, coat, hat) that could be used to conceal items or substances that could be used to tamper with a specimen. You must also direct the employee to leave these garments and any briefcase, purse, or other personal belongings with you or in a mutually agreeable location. You must advise the employee that failure to comply with your directions constitutes a refusal to test.

(1) If the employee asks for a receipt for any belongings left with you, you must provide one.

(2) You must allow the employee to keep his or her wallet.

(3) You must not ask the employee to remove other clothing (e.g., shirts, pants, dresses, underwear), to remove all clothing, or to change into a hospital or examination gown (unless the urine collection is being accomplished simultaneously with a DOT agency-authorized medical examination).

(4) You must direct the employee to empty his or her pockets and display the items in them to ensure that no items are present which could be used to adulterate the specimen. If nothing is there that can be used to adulterate a specimen, the employee can place the items back into his or her pockets. As the employee, you must allow the collector to make this observation.

(5) If, in your duties under paragraph (f)(4) of this section, you find any material that could be used to tamper with a specimen, you must:

(i) Determine if the material appears to be brought to the collection site with the intent to alter the specimen, and, if it is, either conduct a directly observed urine collection using direct observation procedures (see § 40.67) or an oral fluid specimen collection, make a note on the CCF and continue with collection process; or

(ii) Determine if the material appears to be inadvertently brought to the collection site (e.g., eye drops), secure and maintain it until the collection process is completed and conduct a normal (i.e., unobserved) collection.

(g) You must instruct the employee not to list medications that he or she is currently taking on the CCF. (The employee may make notes of medications on the back of the employee copy of the form for his or her own convenience, but these notes must not be transmitted to anyone else.)

[65 FR 79526, Dec. 19, 2000, as amended at 88 FR 27640, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.63 - What steps does the collector take in the collection process before the employee provides a urine specimen?

As the collector, you must take the following steps before the employee provides the urine specimen:

(a) Ensure all items under Step 1 of the CCF are complete and accurate (e.g., if Step 1.D is not checked, put a check mark for the “Specify DOT Agency” under the authority of which the test will take place; if the address where the collection is actually taking place is not in Step 1.G, update that.)

(b) Instruct the employee to wash and dry his or her hands at this time. You must tell the employee not to wash his or her hands again until after delivering the specimen to you. You must not give the employee any further access to water or other materials that could be used to adulterate or dilute a specimen.

(c) Select, or allow the employee to select, an individually wrapped or sealed collection container from collection kit materials. Either you or the employee, with both of you present, must unwrap or break the seal of the collection container. You must not unwrap or break the seal on any specimen bottle at this time. You must not allow the employee to take anything from the collection kit into the room used for urination except the collection container.

(d) Direct the employee to go into the room used for urination, provide a specimen of at least 45 mL, not flush the toilet, and return to you with the specimen as soon as the employee has completed the void.

(1) Except in the case of an observed or a monitored collection (see §§ 40.67 and 40.69), neither you nor anyone else may go into the room with the employee.

(2) As the collector, you may set a reasonable time limit for voiding.

(e) You must pay careful attention to the employee during the entire collection process to note any conduct that clearly indicates an attempt to tamper with a specimen (e.g., substitute urine in plain view or an attempt to bring into the collection site an adulterant or urine substitute). If you detect such conduct, you must require that a collection take place immediately under direct observation (see § 40.67) and complete Step 2 by noting the conduct in the “Remarks” line of the CCF and the fact that the collection was observed by checking the “Observed” box. You must also, as soon as possible, inform the DER and collection site supervisor that a collection took place under direct observation and the reason for doing so.

[65 FR 79526, Dec. 19, 2000, as amended at 75 FR 59107, Sept. 27, 2010; 88 FR 27641, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.65 - What does the collector check for when the employee presents a urine specimen?

As a collector, you must check the following when the employee gives the collection container to you:

(a) Sufficiency of specimen. You must check to ensure that the specimen contains at least 45 mL of urine.

(1) If it does not, you must follow “shy bladder” procedures (see § 40.193(b)).

(2) When you follow “shy bladder” procedures, you must discard the original specimen, unless another problem (i.e., temperature out of range, signs of tampering) also exists.

(3) You are never permitted to combine urine collected from separate voids to create a specimen.

(4) You must discard any excess urine.

(b) Temperature. You must check the temperature of the specimen no later than four minutes after the employee has given you the specimen.

(1) The acceptable temperature range is 32-38 °C/90-100 °F.

(2) You must determine the temperature of the specimen by reading the temperature strip attached to the collection container.

(3) If the specimen temperature is within the acceptable range, you must mark the “Yes” box on the CCF (Step 2).

(4) If the specimen temperature is outside the acceptable range, you must mark the “No” box and enter in the “Remarks” line (Step 2) your findings about the temperature.

(5) If the specimen temperature is outside the acceptable range, you must immediately conduct a new urine collection using direct observation procedures (see § 40.67) or an oral fluid collection.

(6) In a case where a specimen is collected under direct observation because of the temperature being out of range, you must process both the original specimen and the specimen collected using direct observation (including oral fluid) and send the two sets of specimens to their respective laboratories. This is true even in a case in which the original specimen has insufficient volume and the temperature is out of range. You must also, as soon as possible, inform the DER and collection site supervisor that a collection took place under direct observation and the reason for doing so.

(7) In a case where the employee refuses to provide another specimen (see § 40.191(a)(3)) or refuses to provide another specimen under direct observation (see § 40.191(a)(4)), you must notify the DER. As soon as you have notified the DER, you must discard any specimen the employee has provided previously during the collection procedure.

(c) Signs of tampering. You must inspect the specimen for unusual color, presence of foreign objects or material, or other signs of tampering (e.g., if you notice any unusual odor).

(1) If it is apparent from this inspection that the employee has tampered with the specimen (e.g., blue dye in the specimen, excessive foaming when shaken, or smell of bleach), you must immediately conduct a new urine collection using direct observation procedures (see § 40.67) or an oral fluid collection.

(2) In a case where a specimen is collected under direct observation because of showing signs of tampering, you must process both the original specimen and the specimen collected using direct observation and send the two sets of specimens to the laboratory. This is true even in a case in which the original specimen has insufficient volume but it shows signs of tampering. You must also, as soon as possible, inform the DER and collection site supervisor that a collection took place under direct observation and the reason for doing so.

(3) In a case where the employee refuses to provide a specimen under direct observation (see § 40.191(a)(4)), you must discard any specimen the employee provided previously during the collection procedure. Then you must notify the DER as soon as practicable.

[65 FR 79526, Dec. 19, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 41950, Aug. 9, 2001; 88 FR 27641, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed urine collection conducted?

(a) As an employer, you must direct an immediate collection under direct observation with no advance notice to the employee, if:

(1) The laboratory reported to the MRO that a specimen is invalid, and the MRO reported to you that there was not an adequate medical explanation for the result;

(2) The MRO reported to you that the original positive, adulterated, or substituted result had to be cancelled because the test of the split specimen could not be performed; or

(3) The laboratory reported to the MRO that the specimen was negative-dilute with a creatinine concentration greater than or equal to 2 mg/dL but less than or equal to 5 mg/dL, and the MRO reported the specimen to you as negative-dilute and that a second collection must take place under direct observation (see § 40.197(b)(1)).

(4) You realize a collection under direct observation was required but was not conducted or the service agent informs you that a direct observation should have been collected but was not (see paragraph (n) of this section).

(b) As an employer, you must direct a collection under direct observation of an employee if the drug test is a return-to-duty test or a follow-up test.

(c) As a collector, you must immediately conduct a collection under direct observation if:

(1) You are directed by the DER to do so (see paragraph (a) of this section); or

(2) You observed materials brought to the collection site or the employee's conduct clearly indicates an attempt to tamper with a specimen (see §§ 40.61(f)(5)(i) and 40.63(e)); or

(3) The temperature on the original specimen was out of range (see § 40.65(b)(5));

(4) The original specimen appeared to have been tampered with (see § 40.65(c)(1)); or

(5) The test reason is return-to-duty or follow-up.

(d)(1) As the employer, you must explain to the employee the reason for a directly observed collection under paragraph (a) or (b) of this section.

(2) As the collector, you must explain to the employee the reason, if known, under this part for a directly observed collection.

(e) As the collector, you must complete a new CCF for the directly observed collection.

(1) You must mark the “reason for test” block (Step 1) the same as for the first collection.

(2) You must check the “Observed, (Enter Remark)” box and enter the reason (see paragraphs (c)(2) through (4) of this section) in the “Remarks” line (Step 2).

(f) In a case where two sets of specimens are being sent to the laboratory because of suspected tampering with the specimen at the collection site, enter on the “Remarks” line of the CCF (Step 2) for each specimen a notation to this effect (e.g., collection 1 of 2, or 2 of 2) and the specimen ID number of the other specimen.

(g) As the collector, you must ensure that the observer is the same gender as the employee.

(1) You must never permit an opposite gender person to act as the observer.

(2) The observer can be a different person from the collector and need not be a qualified collector.

(3) If a same gender collector cannot be found or in circumstances of nonbinary or transgender employees:

(i) If the employer has a standing order to allow oral fluid testing in such situations, the collector will follow that order;

(ii) If there is no standing order from the employer, the collector must contact the DER and either conduct an oral fluid test if the collection site is able to do so, or send the employee to a collection site acceptable to the employer for the oral fluid test.

(h) As the collector, if someone else is to observe the collection (e.g., in order to ensure a same gender observer), you must verbally instruct that person to follow procedures at paragraphs (i) and (j) of this section. If you, the collector, are the observer, you too must follow these procedures.

(i) As the observer, you must request the employee to raise his or her shirt, blouse, or dress/skirt, as appropriate, above the waist; and lower clothing and underpants to show you, by turning around, that they do not have a prosthetic device. After you have determined that the employee does not have such a device, you may permit the employee to return clothing to its proper position for observed urination.

(j) As the observer, you must watch the employee urinate into the collection container. Specifically, you are to watch the urine go from the employee's body into the collection container.

(k) As the observer but not the collector, you must not take the collection container from the employee, but you must observe the specimen as the employee takes it to the collector.

(l) As the collector, when someone else has acted as the observer, you must include the observer's name in the “Remarks” line of the CCF (Step 2).

(m) As the employee, if you decline to allow a directly observed collection required or permitted under this section to occur, this is a refusal to test.

(n) As a service agent, when you learn that a directly observed collection should have been collected but was not, you must inform the employer that it must direct the employee to have an immediate recollection under direct observation.

[65 FR 79526, Dec. 19, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 41950, Aug. 9, 2001; 68 FR 31626, May 28, 2003; 69 FR 64867, Nov. 9, 2004; 73 FR 35970, June 25, 2008; 73 FR 50223, Aug. 26, 2008; 73 FR 62910, Oct. 22, 2008; 73 FR 70284, Nov. 20, 2008; 74 FR 37952, July 30, 2009; 82 FR 52244, Nov. 13, 2017; 88 FR 27641, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.69 - How is a monitored urine collection conducted?

(a) As stated in § 40.42(f)(2), if you are conducting a urine collection in a multi-stall restroom and you cannot secure all sources of water and other substances that could be used for adulteration and substitution, you must conduct a monitored collection. This is the only circumstance in which you must conduct a monitored collection.

(b) As the collector, you must secure the room being used for the monitored collection so that no one except the employee and the monitor can enter it until after the collection has been completed.

(c) As the collector, you must ensure that the monitor is the same gender as the employee, unless the monitor is a medical professional (e.g., nurse, doctor, physician's assistant, technologist, or technician licensed or certified to practice in the jurisdiction in which the collection takes place). The monitor can be a different person from the collector and need not be a qualified collector.

(d) As the collector, if someone else is to monitor the collection (e.g., in order to ensure a same-gender monitor), you must verbally instruct that person to follow the procedures of paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section. If you, the collector, are the monitor, you must follow these procedures.

(e) As the monitor, you must not watch the employee urinate into the collection container. If you hear sounds or make other observations indicating an attempt to tamper with a specimen, there must be an additional collection under direct observation. See §§ 40.63(e), 40.65(c), and 40.67(c)(2)(3)).

(f) As the monitor, you must ensure that the employee takes the collection container directly to the collector as soon as the employee has exited the enclosure.

(g) As the collector, when someone else has acted as the monitor, you must note that person's name in the “Remarks” line of the CCF (Step 2).

(h) As the employee being tested, if you decline to permit a collection authorized under this section to be monitored, it is a refusal to test.

[65 FR 79526, Dec. 19, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 41951, Aug. 9, 2001; 88 FR 27641, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.71 - How does the collector prepare the urine specimen?

(a) All collections under DOT agency drug testing regulations must be split specimen collections.

(b) As the collector, you must take the following steps, in order, after the employee brings the urine specimen to you. You must take these steps in the presence of the employee.

(1) After the collection, check the box on the CCF (Step 2) indicating that this was a “Urine” and “Split” specimen collection.

(2) You, not the employee, must first pour at least 30 mL of urine from the collection container into one specimen bottle, to be used for the primary specimen.

(3) You, not the employee, must then pour at least 15 mL of urine from the collection container into the second specimen bottle to be used for the split specimen.

(4) You, not the employee, must place and secure (i.e., tighten or snap) the lids/caps on the bottles.

(5) You, not the employee, must seal the bottles by placing the tamper-evident bottle seals over the bottle caps/lids and down the sides of the bottles.

(6) You, not the employee, must then write the date on the tamper-evident bottle seals.

(7) You must then ensure that the employee initials the tamper-evident bottle seals for the purpose of certifying that the bottles contain the specimens he or she provided. If the employee fails or refuses to do so, you must note this in the “Remarks” line of the CCF (Step 2) and complete the collection process.

(8) You must discard any urine left over in the collection container after both specimen bottles have been appropriately filled and sealed. There is one exception to this requirement: you may use excess urine to conduct clinical tests (e.g., protein, glucose) if the collection was conducted in conjunction with a physical examination required by a DOT agency regulation. Neither you nor anyone else may conduct further testing (such as adulteration testing) on this excess urine and the employee has no legal right to demand that the excess urine be turned over to the employee.

[65 FR 79526, Dec. 19, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 41951, Aug. 9, 2001; 88 FR 27641, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.72 - What steps does the collector take in the collection process before the employee provides an oral fluid specimen?

(a) The collector requests that the employee open the employee's mouth, and the collector inspects the oral cavity to ensure that it is free of any items that could impede or interfere with the collection of an oral fluid specimen (e.g., candy, gum, food, or tobacco) or could be used to adulterate, substitute, or alter the specimen.

(1) If the collector finds indication(s) of anything identified above, the collector will ask the employee to lift their tongue and/or separate their cheek from their gum to permit full inspection. If this occurs, the employee may cleanse his or her hands, but must not decline the collector's request for further inspection.

(2) If the employee claims that he or she has a medical condition that prevents opening his or her mouth for inspection, the collector follows the procedure described in § 40.193(a).

(3) If the collector observes materials brought to the collection site or the employee's conduct clearly indicates an attempt to adulterate, substitute, or alter the specimen, the collector must terminate the collection, note the circumstances in the Remarks section of the CCF, and report the circumstances to the DER, so that the employer can decide whether to deem the situation a refusal in accordance with § 40.191(a).

(b) If an item is present that might impede or interfere with the collection of an oral fluid specimen, the collector must request the employee remove the item.

(1) If the employee removes any item that could impede or interfere with the collection of an oral fluid specimen, the employee has abnormally colored saliva, or the employee claims to have “dry mouth,” then the collector must give the employee water, up to 8 ounces, to rinse their mouth. The employee may drink the water. The collector must then wait 10 minutes before beginning the specimen collection.

(2) If the employee refuses to remove the item or rinse, the collector must terminate the collection, note the circumstances in the Remarks section of the CCF, and report the information to the DER to test as described in § 40.191(a)(8) (failure to cooperate), so that the employer can decide whether to deem the situation a refusal.

(c) If there is nothing of concern in the oral cavity and no “dry mouth” condition, the collector starts a 10-minute wait period and proceeds with the steps below before beginning the specimen collection as described in § 40.73.

(d) During the 10-minute wait period:

(1) Review with the employee the procedures required for a successful oral fluid specimen collection as stated in the manufacturer's instructions for the specimen collection device.

(2) Complete all items under Step 1 of the CCF, and for clarification:

(i) In Step 1.D of the CCF, the collector must put a check mark for the “Specify DOT Agency” under whose authority the test will take place.

(ii) In Step 1.G of the CCF for the “Collection Site Address”, the collector must provide the address where the collection took place.

(3) The collector will provide, or the employee may select, a specimen collection device that is clean, unused, and wrapped/sealed in original packaging.

(i) The collector will check the expiration date on the device or the package containing the device and show it to the employee.

(ii) The collector must not use the device after its expiration date.

(iii) The collector must open the specimen collection device in view of the employee.

(4) The collector will complete Step 2 of the CCF.

(i) Check “Oral Fluid”,

(ii) For “Oral Fluid: Split Type” check “Subdivided”, and

(iii) Check “Each Device Within Expiration Date?” after ensuring the device is within its expiration date.

(5) The collector will enter the Split Specimen Device Expiration Date in Step 4 of the CCF. Since the collector will use one oral fluid device that will collect a single specimen, which is then subdivided in the presence of the donor, only one entry in Step 4 is to be made for the device expiration date.

(6) The collector must instruct the employee to use hand sanitizer or wash and dry his or her hands.

(e) To the greatest extent practicable, the collector must keep the employee's unwrapped collection device within view of both the collector and the employee, between the time the employee has provided a specimen and the specimen is sealed.

[88 FR 27642, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.73 - How is an oral fluid specimen collected?

(a) The collector must be present and maintain visual contact with the employee during the procedures outlined in this section.

(b) The collector must note any unusual behavior or appearance of the employee on the CCF. If the collector detects any conduct that clearly indicates an attempt to tamper with a specimen (e.g., an attempt to bring into the collection site an adulterant or oral fluid substitute), the collector must terminate the collection and report the information to the DER so that the employer can decide whether to deem the situation a refusal.

(c) The employee and collector must complete the specimen collection in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions for the collection device.

(1) Under the observation of the collector, the employee is responsible for positioning the specimen collection device for collection.

(2) The collector must ensure the collection is performed correctly (i.e., using the oral fluid device in the manner described by its manufacturer), that the collection device is working properly, and that a sufficient specimen volume is collected.

(3) If the employee states that he or she is unable to provide an oral fluid specimen or provides an insufficient specimen during the collection process, the collector must continue to make one attempt to collect, after an insufficient specimen, the collector follows the procedure in § 40.193.

(4) The collector must inspect the specimen for unusual color, presence of foreign objects or material, or other signs of tampering. If it is apparent from this inspection that the employee has tampered with the specimen, the collector must conduct a new collection.

(i) Document any unusual characteristics referenced above in the Remarks section of the CCF.

(ii) Proceed with obtaining the new oral fluid specimen from the donor. Note on the new CCF that this is another collection for the same testing event (i.e., Document in the remarks section that this is Specimen 2 of 2 and include the Specimen ID number of the other specimen). Make the same notation on the CCF of the suspect specimen.

[88 FR 27642, May 2, 2023]

§ 40.74 - How does the collector prepare the oral fluid specimens?

(a) The collector follows the manufacturer's instructions to package the split specimen collections.

(b) A volume of at least 1 mL of undiluted (neat) oral fluid is collected for the specimen designated as “Bottle A”, and a volume of at least 1 mL of undiluted (neat) oral fluid is collected for the specimen designated as “Bottle B”, or an otherwise sufficient amount of oral fluid is collected to permit an HHS-certified laboratory to analyze the specimen(s).

(c) In the presence of the employee, the collector places a tamper-evident seal from the CCF over the cap of each specimen container, taking care not to obstruct the expiration date on the collection containers. The collector must record the date of the collection on the tamper-evident seals, after they are affixed to the specimen containers.

(d) The collector instructs the employee to initial the tamper-evident seals on each specimen container. If the employee declines to do so, the collector must note this in the “Remarks” line of the CCF (Step 2) and complete the collection process.

[88 FR 27642, May 2, 2023]

§§ 40.75-40.78 - §[Reserved]

§ 40.79 - How is the collection process completed?

(a) As the collector, when using the paper CCF, you must do the following things to complete the collection process. You must complete the steps called for in paragraphs (a)(1) through (7) of this section in the employee's presence.

(1) Direct the employee to read and sign the certification statement on Copy 2 of the CCF and provide all information required in Step 5. If the employee declines to sign the CCF or to provide any of the required information, you must note this in the “Remarks” line (Step 2) of the CCF and complete the collection. If the employee declines to fill out any information, you must, as a minimum, print the employee's name in the appropriate place.

(2) Complete the chain of custody on the CCF (Step 4) by printing your name (note: you may pre-print your name), recording the time and date of the collection, signing the statement, and entering the name of the delivery service transferring the specimen to the laboratory,

(3) Ensure that all copies of the CCF are legible and complete.

(4) Remove Copy 5 of the CCF and give it to the employee.

(5) Place the specimen bottles and Copy 1 of the CCF in the appropriate pouches of the plastic bag.

(6) Secure both pouches of the plastic bag.

(7) Advise the employee that he or she may leave the collection site.

(8) To prepare the sealed plastic bag containing the specimens and CCF for shipment you must:

(i) Place the sealed plastic bag in a shipping container (e.g., standard courier box) designed to minimize the possibility of damage during shipment. (More than one sealed plastic bag can be placed into a single shipping container if you are doing multiple collections.)

(ii) Seal the container as appropriate.

(iii) If a laboratory courier hand-delivers the specimens from the collection site to the laboratory, prepare the sealed plastic bag for shipment as directed by the courier service.

(9) Send Copy 2 of the CCF to the MRO and Copy 4 to the DER. You must fax or otherwise transmit these copies to the MRO and DER within 24 hours or during the next business day. Keep Copy 3 for at least 30 days, unless otherwise specified by applicable DOT agency regulations.

(b) As a collector, when using other forms of the CCF as approved by the Office of Management and Budget, you must follow the procedures approved for that form.

(c) As a collector or collection site, you must ensure that each specimen you collect is shipped to a laboratory as quickly as possible, but in any case, within 24 hours or during the next business day.

[65 FR 79526, Dec. 19, 2000, as amended at 71 FR 49384, Aug. 23, 2006; 80 FR 19553, Apr. 13, 2015. Redesignated and amended at 88 FR 27641, 27643, May 2, 2023]