U.S. Code of Federal Regulations

Regulations most recently checked for updates: Jun 20, 2024

CANADA 9

§ 93.417 - Import permit and declaration for ruminants.

(a) For ruminants intended for importation from Canada, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in § 93.404: Provided, That an import permit is not required for ruminants offered for entry at a land border port designated in § 93.403(b) if such ruminant is:

(1) A wether;

(2) A sheep or goat imported for immediate slaughter; or

(3) A ruminant other than a sheep or goat and that ruminant:

(i) Was born in Canada or the United States, and has been in no region other than Canada or the United States, or

(ii) Has been legally imported into Canada from some other region and unconditionally released in Canada so as to be eligible to move freely within that region without restriction of any kind and has been in Canada after such release for 60 days or longer.

(b) For all ruminants offered for importation from Canada, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in § 93.407.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 60 FR 13900, Mar. 15, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997]

§ 93.418 - Cattle and other bovines from Canada.

(a) Health certificates. Cattle intended for importation from Canada must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405(a). The certificate must state that the cattle have been inspected and were found to be free from any evidence of communicable disease and that, as far as can be determined, they have not been exposed to any such disease during the preceding 60 days. Cattle found unqualified upon inspection at the port of entry will be refused entry into the United States.

(b)-(c) [Reserved]

(d) Conditions for importation. In addition to meeting the other requirements of this section, bovines may be imported from Canada only under the following conditions:

(1) The bovines are imported for immediate slaughter under § 93.420; or

(2) The bovines are imported for other than immediate slaughter under the following conditions:

(i) The bovines were born after March 1, 1999, the date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in Canada;

(ii) The bovines are imported only through a port of entry listed in § 93.403(b) or as provided for in § 93.403(f);

(iii) The bovines were officially identified prior to arriving at the port of entry in the United States with unique individual identification that is traceable to each bovine's premises of origin. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter; and

(iv) The bovines are permanently and humanely identified using one of the following additional methods:

(A) A “CΛN” mark properly applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method, and easily visible on the live animal and on the carcass before skinning. Such a mark must be not less than 2 inches nor more than 3 inches high, and must be applied to each animal's right hip, high on the tail-head (over the junction of the sacral and first coccygeal vertebrae); or

(B) A tattoo with the letters “CΛN” applied to the inside of one ear of the animal; or

(C) Other means of permanent identification upon request if deemed adequate by the Administrator to humanely identify the animal in a distinct and legible way as having been imported from Canada.

(3) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405 that states, in addition to the statements required by § 93.405, that the conditions of paragraph (d)(2) of this section, as applicable, have been met.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0393) [55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 55 FR 49990, Dec. 4, 1990; 58 FR 37641, July 13, 1993; 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994; 61 FR 17238, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 71 FR 12997, Mar. 14, 2006; 78 FR 72996, Dec. 4, 2013; 78 FR 73993, Dec. 10, 2013; 85 FR 57952, Sept. 17, 2020]

§ 93.419 - [Reserved]

§ 93.420 - Ruminants from Canada for immediate slaughter other than sheep and goats.

(a) General requirements. The requirements for the importation of sheep and goats from Canada for immediate slaughter are contained in § 93.435. There are no BSE-related restrictions on the importation of cervids or camelids from Canada. All other ruminants imported from Canada for immediate slaughter, in addition to meeting all other applicable requirements of this part, may be imported only under the following conditions:

(1) The ruminants must be imported only through a port of entry listed in § 93.403(b) or as provided for in § 93.403(f) and be inspected at the port of entry and otherwise handled in accordance with § 93.408.

(2) The ruminants must be moved directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment in conveyances that are sealed with seals of the U.S. Government at the port of entry. The seals may be broken only at the recognized slaughtering establishment by an authorized USDA representative.

(3) The ruminants must be accompanied from the port of entry to the recognized slaughtering establishment by APHIS Form VS 17-33, which must include the location of the recognized slaughtering establishment.

(b) Bovines. In addition to meeting the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, bovines may be imported from Canada for immediate slaughter only under the following conditions:

(1) The bovines must have been born after March 1, 1999, the date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in Canada;

(2) Before the animal's arrival at the port of entry into the United States, each bovine imported into the United States from Canada must be officially identified with unique individual identification that is traceable to the premises of origin of the animal. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter; and

(3) The bovines must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405 that states, in addition to the statements required by § 93.405, that the conditions of paragraphs (b)(1) and (b)(2) of this section have been met.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0234 and 0579-0393) [78 FR 72996, Dec. 4, 2013, as amended at 86 FR 68859, Dec. 3, 2021; 87 FR 29, Jan. 3, 2022]

§ 93.421 - Special provisions.

(a) In-bond shipments from Canada. (1) Cattle, sheep, and goats from Canada transported in-bond through the United States for immediate export shall be inspected at the border port of entry and, when accompanied by an import permit obtained under § 93.404 of this part and all conditions therein are observed, shall be allowed entry into the United States and shall be otherwise handled as provided in paragraph (b) of § 93.401. Ruminants not accompanied by a permit shall meet the requirements of this part in the same manner as ruminants destined for importation into the United States, except that the Administrator may permit their inspection at some other point when he or she finds that such action will not increase the risk that communicable diseases of livestock and poultry will be disseminated to the livestock or poultry of the United States.

(2) In-transit shipments through Canada. Ruminants originating in the United States and transported directly through Canada may re-enter the United States without Canadian health or test certificates when accompanied by copies of the United States export health certificates properly issued and endorsed in accordance with regulations in part 91 of this chapter: Provided, That, to qualify for entry, the date, time, port of entry, and signature of the Canadian Port Veterinarian that inspected the ruminants for entry into Canada shall be recorded on the United States health certificate, or a document containing information shall be included with the certificate that accompanies the ruminants. In all cases it shall be determined by the veterinary inspector at the United States port of entry that the ruminants are the identical ruminants covered by said certificate.

(b) Exhibition ruminants. Ruminants from the United States which have been exhibited at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair at Toronto or other publicly recognized expositions in Canada, including racing, rodeo, circus, or stage exhibitions in Canada, and have not been in that region for more than 90 days are eligible for return to the United States without Canadian health or test certificates, if they are accompanied by copies of the United States health certificate, issued and endorsed in accordance with the export regulations contained in part 91 of this chapter for entry into Canada: Provided, That all ruminants offered for re-entry upon examination by the veterinary inspector at the U.S. port of entry, are found by the inspector to be free of communicable diseases and exposure thereto and are determined to be the identical ruminants covered by said certificates or are the natural increase of such ruminants born after official test dates certified on the dam's health certificate.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§ 93.400 - Definitions.

Wherever in this subpart the following terms are used, unless the context otherwise requires, they shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

Accredited herd for brucellosis. A herd that meets APHIS' standards for accreditation for brucellosis status. Standards for accreditation are specified in import protocols.

Accredited herd for tuberculosis. A herd that meets APHIS' standards for accreditation for bovine tuberculosis status. Standards for accreditation are specified in import protocols.

Accredited veterinarian. A veterinarian approved by the Administrator in accordance with the provisions of part 161 of this title to perform functions specified in parts 1, 2, 3, and 11 of subchapter A, and subchapters B, C, and D of this chapter, and to perform functions required by cooperative state-federal disease control and eradication programs.

Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service or any other employee of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, to whom authority has been or may be delegated to act in the Administrator's stead.

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (APHIS or Service).

Animals. Cattle, sheep, goats, other ruminants, swine, horses, asses, mules, zebras, dogs, and poultry.

APHIS representative. A veterinarian or other individual employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, who is authorized to perform the services required by this part.

Area veterinarian in charge (AVIC). The veterinary official of APHIS who is assigned by the Administrator to supervise and perform the official animal health work of APHIS in the State concerned.

As a group. Collectively, in such a manner that the identity of the animals as a unique group is maintained.

Authorized USDA representative. An APHIS Veterinary Services employee, a USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service inspector, a State representative, an accredited veterinarian, or an employee of an accredited veterinarian, slaughtering establishment, or feedlot who is designated by the accredited veterinarian or management of the slaughtering establishment or feedlot to perform the function involved. In order to designate an employee to break official seals, an accredited veterinarian or the management of a slaughtering establishment or feedlot must first supply in writing the name of the designated individual to the APHIS AVIC in the State where the seals will be broken. Additionally, the management of a slaughtering establishment or feedlot must enter into an agreement with Veterinary Services in which the management of the facility agrees that only designated individuals will break the seals, that the facility will contact an APHIS representative or USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service inspector immediately if the seals are not intact when the means of conveyance arrives or if the animals being transported appear to be sick or injured due to transport conditions, and that the facility will cooperate with APHIS representatives, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service inspectors, and State representatives in maintaining records of sealed shipments received.

Bovine. Bos taurus, Bos indicus, and Bison bison.

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) minimal risk region. A region listed in § 94.18(a)(3) of this subchapter.

Brucellosis. Infection with or disease caused by Brucella abortus.

Brucellosis certified free herd. A herd in which all eligible cattle in the herd were negative to brucellosis tests under the Canadian requirements and which is officially certified by the Canadian Government as a brucellosis free listed herd.

Camelid. All species of the family Camelidae, including camels, guanacos, llamas, alpacas, and vicunas.

Cattle. Animals of the bovine species.

Certified status. A flock that has met requirements equivalent to the Export Certified status of the U.S. Scrapie Flock Certification Program while participating in a program under the supervision of the national veterinary authority of the region of origin, as determined by an evaluation conducted by APHIS of the program.

Cervid. All members of the family Cervidae and hybrids, including deer, elk, moose, caribou, reindeer, and related species.

Classical scrapie. Any form of scrapie that the Administrator has determined poses a significant risk of natural transmission.

Communicable disease. Any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease of domestic livestock, poultry or other animals.

Country mark. A permanent mark approved by the Administrator for identifying a sheep or goat to its country of origin.

Department. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Designated feedlot. A feedlot designated by the Administrator as one eligible to receive sheep and goats from regions not free of classical scrapie, and whose owner or legally responsible representative has signed an agreement as specified in § 93.435(c)(11) and is in full compliance with all the provisions of the agreement.

Exporting region. A region from which shipments are sent to the United States.

Federal veterinarian. A veterinarian employed and authorized by the Federal Government to perform the tasks required by this subpart.

Fever tick, Rhipicephalus annulatus, Rhipicephalus microplus, and any other species of tick determined by the Administrator to be a vector of bovine babesiosis and specified on the Internet at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/disease-status-of-regions.

Flock. Any group of one or more sheep or goats maintained on a single premise, or on more than one premises under the same ownership and between which unrestricted movement is allowed; or two or more groups of sheep or goats under common ownership or supervision on two or more premises that are geographically separated, but among which there is an interchange or movement of animals.

Flock of birth. The flock into which a sheep or goat is born.

Flock of residence. The flock:

(1) Within which an individual sheep or goat was born, raised, and resided until exported to the United States; or

(2) In which the sheep or goat resided for breeding purposes for 60 days or more until exported to the United States; or

(3) In which sheep and goats for export were assembled for export to the United States and maintained for at least 60 days immediately prior to export, without any addition of animals or contact with animals other than through birth, on a single premises, or on more than one premises under the same ownership and between which unrestricted movement occurred.

Goat. Any animal of the genus Capra.

Herd. Any group of one or more animals maintained on common ground; or two or more groups of animals under common ownership or supervision on two or more premises that are geographically separated, but among which there is an interchange or movement of animals.

Herd of origin. A herd of one or more sires and dams and their offspring from which animals in a consignment presented for export to the United States originate. The herd of origin may be the birth herd or the herd where the animal has resided for a minimum 4-month period immediately prior to movement, unless otherwise specified in an import criteria. Additional animals can be moved into a herd of origin during or after the 4-month qualifying period only if they:

(1) Originate from an accredited herd; or

(2) Originate from a herd of origin that tested negative to a whole herd test conducted within the last 12 months and the individual animals being moved into the herd also tested negative to any additional individual tests for tuberculosis and brucellosis required by the Administrator.

Immediate slaughter. Consignment directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment 1 and slaughtered within 2 weeks from the date of entry.

1 The name of recognized slaughtering establishments approved under this part may be obtained from the area veterinarian in charge for the State of destination of the shipment. The name and address of the area veterinarian in charge in any State is available from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Strategy and Policy, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

Import protocol. A document issued by APHIS and provided to officials of the competent veterinary authority of an exporting region that specifies in detail the mitigation measures that will comply with the regulations in this part regarding the import of certain animals or commodities.

Individual test. A test for brucellosis or tuberculosis that is approved by the Administrator and that is administered individually in accordance with this part to ruminants that are susceptible to brucellosis or tuberculosis.

Inspector. Any individual authorized by the Administrator of APHIS or the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security, to enforce the regulations in this subpart.

Killed and completely destroyed. Killed, or maintained under quarantine in a manner preventing disease spread until the animal is no longer living; and the remains have been disposed of in a manner preventing disease spread.

Lot. A group of ruminants that, while held on a conveyance or premises, has opportunity for physical contact with each other or with each other's excrement or discharges at any time between arrival at the quarantine facility and 60 days prior to export to the United States.

Lot-holding area. That area in a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility in which a single lot of ruminants is held at one time.

Moved directly. Moved without unloading and without stopping except for refueling, or for traffic conditions such as traffic lights or stop signs.

Moved directly by land. Moved by rail, truck, or other land vehicle without unloading and without stopping except for refueling, or for traffic conditions such as traffic lights or stop signs.

Non-classical scrapie. Any form of scrapie the Administrator has determined poses a low risk of natural transmission.

Non-negative test results. Any test results for tuberculosis or brucellosis within the suspect, reactor, or positive range parameters of a pathogen assay that has been approved by the Administrator.

Nonquarantine area. That area of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility that includes offices, storage areas, and other areas outside the quarantine area, and that is off limits to ruminants, samples taken from ruminants, and any other objects or substances that have been in the quarantine area during the quarantine of ruminants.

Notifiable disease. A disease for which confirmed or suspected occurrences within a region must be reported to the competent veterinary authority or other competent authority of that region.

Official identification device or method. A means of officially identifying an animal or group of animals using devices or methods approved by the Administrator, including, but not limited to, official tags, tattoos, and registered brands when accompanied by a certificate of inspection from a recognized brand inspection authority. For animals intended for importation into the United States, the device or method of identification used must have been approved by the Administrator for that type of import before the animal is exported to the United States.

Officially identified. Individually identified by means of an official identification device or method.

Operator. A person other than the Federal Government who owns or operates, subject to APHIS' approval and oversight, a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility.

Permitted dip. A dip permitted by the Administrator to be used in the official dipping of cattle for fever ticks and for dipping cattle and sheep for scabies.

Persons. Any individual, corporation, company, association, firm, partnership, society or joint stock company.

Port Veterinarian. A veterinarian employed by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to perform duties required under this part at a port of entry.

Positive for a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. A sheep or goat for which a diagnosis of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy has been made.

Premises of origin. Except as otherwise used in § 93.423 of this subpart, the premises where the animal was born.

Prevalence. The number of affected herds occurring during the period specified in §§ 93.437 and 93.440. In some instances, the Administrator may allow calculation of prevalence based on affected herd-years to avoid penalizing regions with small herd numbers.

Privately owned medium security quarantine facility (medium security facility). A facility that:

(1) Is owned, operated, and financed by a person other than the Federal Government;

(2) Is subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives;

(3) Is constructed, operated, and maintained in accordance with the requirements for medium security facilities in § 93.412(d); and

(4) Provides the necessary level of quarantine services for the holding of ruminants in an indoor, vector-proof environment prior to the animals' entry into the United States. Quarantine services would have to include testing or observation for any OIE listed diseases and other livestock diseases exotic to the United States, as well as any other diseases, as necessary, to be determined by the Administrator.

Privately owned minimum security quarantine facility (minimum security facility). A facility that:

(1) Is owned, operated, and financed by a person other than the Federal Government;

(2) Is subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives;

(3) Is constructed, operated, and maintained in accordance with the requirements for minimum security facilities in § 93.412(d);

(4) Is used for the quarantine of ruminants that pose no significant risk, as determined by the Administrator, of introducing or transmitting to the U.S. livestock population any livestock disease that is biologically transmissible by vectors; and

(5) Provides the necessary level of quarantine services for the outdoor holding of ruminants, prior to the animals' entry into the United States. Quarantine services would have to include testing or observation for any OIE listed diseases and other livestock diseases exotic to the United States, as well as any other diseases, as necessary, to be determined by the Administrator.

Processed animal protein. Meat meal, bone meal, meat-and-bone meal, blood meal, dried plasma and other blood products, hydrolyzed protein, hoof meal, horn meal, poultry meal, feather meal, fish meal, and any other similar products.

Quarantine area. That area of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility that comprises all of the lot-holding areas in the facility and any other areas in the facility that ruminants have access to, including loading docks for receiving and releasing ruminants, and any areas used to conduct examinations of ruminants and take samples and any areas where samples are processed or examined.

Recognized slaughtering establishment. Any slaughtering establishment operating under the provisions of the Federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) or a State meat inspection act. 2

2 See footnote 1.

Region. Any defined geographic land area identifiable by geological, political, or surveyed boundaries. A region may consist of any of the following:

(1) A national entity (country);

(2) Part of a national entity (zone, county, department, municipality, parish, Province, State, etc.);

(3) Parts of several national entities combined into an area; or

(4) A group of national entities (countries) combined into a single area.

Ruminants. All animals which chew the cud, such as cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, deer, antelopes, camels, llamas and giraffes.

Sheep. Any animal of the genus Ovis.

Spayed heifer. A female bovine that has been neutered in a manner otherwise approved by the Administrator and specified in an import protocol.

State representative. A veterinarian or other person employed in livestock sanitary work by a State or political subdivision of a State who is authorized by such State or political subdivision of a State to perform the function involved under a memorandum of understanding with APHIS.

State veterinarian. A veterinarian employed and authorized by a State or political subdivision of a State to perform the tasks required by this subpart.

Steer. A sexually neutered male bovine.

Swine. The domestic hog and all varieties of wild hogs.

Temporary inspection facility. A temporary facility that is constructed of metal panels that can be erected and broken down alongside the transportation vessel carrying ruminants that are imported into the United States in accordance with § 93.408 of this subpart and that will be quarantined at a minimum or medium security quarantine facilities located more than 1 mile from the port of entry.

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). A family of progressive and generally fatal neurodegenerative disorders thought to be caused by abnormal proteins, called prions, typically producing characteristic microscopic changes, including, but not limited to, non-inflammatory neuronal loss, giving a spongiform appearance to tissues in the brains and central nervous systems of affected animals.

TSE-affected sheep or goat. A sheep or goat suspected or known by the national veterinary authority of the region of origin to be infected with a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy prior to the disposal of the animal.

Tuberculosis. Infection with or disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis.

United States. All of the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, and all other Territories and Possessions of the United States.

Veterinary Services. The Veterinary Services unit of the Department.

Wether. A castrated male sheep or goat.

Whole herd test for brucellosis. A brucellosis test that has been approved by APHIS of all sexually intact bovines in a herd of origin that are 6 months of age or older, and of all sexually intact bovines in the herd of origin that are less than 6 months of age and were not born into the herd of origin, except those sexually intact bovines that are less than 6 months of age and originate directly from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis.

Whole herd test for tuberculosis. A tuberculosis test that has been approved by APHIS of all bovines in a herd of origin that are 6 months of age or older, and of all bovines in the herd of origin that are less than 6 months of age and were not born into the herd of origin, except those bovines that are less than 6 months of age and originate directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis.

World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The international organization recognized by the World Trade Organization for setting animal health standards, reporting global animal situations and disease status, and presenting guidelines and recommendations on sanitary measures related to animal health.

Zoological park. A professionally operated zoo, park, garden or other place, maintained under the constant surveillance of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, for the exhibition of live animals, pigeons or birds, for the purpose of public recreation or education.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997] Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 93.400, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§ 93.401 - General prohibitions; exceptions.

(a) General provisions. No ruminant or product subject to the provisions of this part shall be brought into the United States except in accordance with the regulations in this part and part 94 of this subchapter; 3 nor shall any such ruminant or product be handled or moved after physical entry into the United States before final release from quarantine or any other form of governmental detention except in compliance with such regulations. Notwithstanding any other provision of this subpart, the importation of any ruminant that is not a bovine, camelid, cervid, sheep, or goat is prohibited. Provided, however, the Administrator may upon request in specific cases permit ruminants or products of such to be brought into or through the United States under such conditions as he or she may prescribe, when he or she determines in the specific case that such action will not endanger the livestock of the United States.

3 Importations of certain animals from various regions are absolutely prohibited under part 94 because of specified diseases.

(b) Ruminants in transit. Except for ruminants prohibited entry, the provisions in this part relating to ruminants shall not apply to healthy ruminants in transit through the United States if they are not known to be infected with or exposed, within 60 days preceding the date of export from the region of origin, to communicable diseases of such ruminants, if an import permit 4 has been obtained under § 93.404 of this chapter and all conditions therein are observed; and if such ruminants are handled as follows:

4 Such permit may be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Strategy and Policy, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231. Requests for approval of such facilities should also be made to the Administrator.

(1)(i) They are maintained under continuous confinement in transit through the United States aboard an aircraft, ocean vessel, or other means of conveyance; or

(ii) They are unloaded, in the course of such transit, into a ruminant holding facility which is provided by the carrier or its agent and has been approved 5 in advance by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section as adequate to prevent the spread within the United States of any livestock disease, and they are maintained there under continuous confinement until loaded aboard a means of conveyance for transportation from the United States and are maintained under continuous confinement aboard such means of conveyance until it leaves the United States; the import permit will specify any additional conditions necessary to assure that the transit of the ruminants through the United States can be made without endangering the livestock or poultry of the United States, and that Department inspectors may inspect the ruminants on board such means of conveyance or in such holding facility to ascertain whether the requirements of this paragraph are met, and dispose of them in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.) if such conditions are not met; and

5 See footnote 4 to subpart D.

(2) The carrier or its agent executes and furnishes to the collector of Customs at the first port of arrival a declaration stating that the ruminants will be retained aboard such means of conveyance or in an approved holding facility during transshipment as required by this paragraph.

(3) Provisions for the approval of facilities required in this paragraph are:

(i) They must be sufficiently isolated to prevent direct or indirect contact with all other animals and birds while in the United States.

(ii) They must be so constructed that they provide adequate protection against environmental conditions and can be adequately cleaned, washed and disinfected.

(iii) They must provide for disposal of ruminant carcasses, manure, bedding, waste and any related shipping materials in a manner that will prevent dissemination of disease.

(iv) They must have provisions for adequate sources of feed and water and for attendants for the care and feeding of ruminants in the facility.

(v) They must comply with additional requirements as may be imposed by the Administrator if deemed applicable for a particular shipment.

(vi) They must also comply with all applicable local, State and Federal requirements for environmental quality and with the provisions of the Animal Welfare Regulations in chapter I of this title, as applicable.

(c) Removal and loss of official identification devices. Official identification devices are intended to provide permanent identification of livestock and to ensure the ability to find the source of animal disease outbreaks. Removal of these devices is prohibited except at the time of slaughter. If an official identification device is lost, and it is necessary to retag an animal with a new official number, every effort should be made to correlate the new official number with the previous official number of the animal.

(d) Cleaning and disinfection prior to shipment. A means of conveyance used to transport an animal to the United States in accordance with this subpart must be cleaned and disinfected in a manner specified within an import protocol prior to transport, unless an exemption has been granted by the Administrator.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 67614, Dec. 30, 1994. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 68 FR 31940, May 29, 2003; 69 FR 64651, Nov. 8, 2004; 78 FR 72996, Dec. 4, 2013; 85 FR 57952, Sept. 17, 2020; 86 FR 45624, Aug. 16, 2021; 86 FR 68857, Dec. 3, 2021]

§ 93.402 - Inspection of certain aircraft and other means of conveyance and shipping containers thereon; unloading, cleaning, and disinfection requirements.

(a) Inspection: All aircraft and other means of conveyance (including shipping containers thereon) moving into the United States from any foreign region are subject to inspection without a warrant by properly identified and designated inspectors to determine whether they are carrying any animal, carcass, product or article regulated or subject to disposal under any law or regulation administered by the Secretary of Agriculture for prevention of the introduction or dissemination of any communicable animal disease.

(b) Unloading requirements: Whenever in the course of any such inspection at any port in the United States the inspector has reason to believe that the means of conveyance or container is contaminated with material of animal (including poultry) origin, such as, but not limited to, meat, organs, glands, extracts, secretions, fat, bones, blood, lymph, urine, or manure, so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, the inspector may require the unloading of the means of conveyance and the emptying of the container if he or she deems it necessary to enable him or her to determine whether the means of conveyance or container is in fact so contaminated. The principal operator of the means of conveyance and his or her agent in charge of the means of conveyance shall comply with any such requirement under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(c) Cleaning and disinfection: Whenever, upon inspection under this section, an inspector determines that a means of conveyance or shipping container is contaminated with material of animal origin so as to present a danger of the spread of any communicable animal disease, he or she shall notify the principal operator of the means of conveyance or his or her agent in charge, of such determination and the requirements under this section. The person so notified shall cause the cleaning and disinfection of such means of conveyance and container under the immediate supervision of, and in the time and manner prescribed by, the inspector.

(d) For purposes of this section, the term “shipping container” means any container of a type specially adapted for use in transporting any article on the means of conveyance involved.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§ 93.403 - Ports designated for the importation of ruminants.

(a) Air and ocean ports. The following ports have APHIS inspection and quarantine facilities necessary for quarantine stations and all ruminants shall be entered into the United States through these stations, except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of this section; Miami, Florida; and Newburgh, New York.

(b) Canadian border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of ruminants from Canada: Eastport, Idaho; Houlton and Jackman, Maine; Detroit, Port Huron, and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; Baudette, Minnesota; Opheim, Raymond, and Sweetgrass, Montana; Alexandria Bay, Buffalo, and Champlain, New York; Dunseith, Pembina, and Portal, North Dakota; Derby Line and Highgate Springs, Vermont; Oroville and Sumas, Washington.

(c) Mexican border ports. The following land border ports are designated as having the necessary inspection facilities for the entry of ruminants from Mexico: Brownsville, Hidalgo, Laredo, Eagle Pass, Del Rio, and Presidio, Texas: Douglas, Naco, Nogales, Sasabe, and San Luis, Arizona; Calexico and San Ysidro, California; and Antelope Wells, Columbus, and Santa Teresa, New Mexico.

(d) Special ports. Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, and Christiansted, St. Croix, in the United States Virgin Islands, are hereby designated as quarantine stations for the entry of ruminants from the British Virgin Islands into the United States Virgin Islands for immediate slaughter.

(e) Limited ports. The following ports are designated as having inspection facilities for the entry of ruminants and ruminant products such as ruminant test specimens which do not appear to require restraint and holding inspection facilities: Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska; San Diego, California; Jacksonville, St. Petersburg-Clearwater, and Tampa, Florida; Atlanta, Georgia; Honolulu, Hawaii, Chicago, Illinois; New Orleans, Louisiana; Portland, Maine; Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Great Falls, Montana; Portland, Oregon; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Memphis, Tennessee (no live animals); El Paso, Galveston, and Houston, Texas; and Seattle, Spokane, and Tacoma, Washington.

(f) Designation of other ports. The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the designation as quarantine stations of the ports specified in this section. In special cases other ports may be designated as quarantine stations under this section by the Administrator, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Treasury.

(g) Ports and privately owned quarantine facilities. Ruminants may be imported into the United States at any port specified in paragraph (a) of this section, or at any other port designated as an international port or airport by the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, and quarantined at an APHIS-approved privately owned quarantine facility, provided the applicable provisions of §§ 93.401, 93.404(a), 93.407, 93.408, and 93.412 are met.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 2010, Jan. 17, 1992; 58 FR 38283, July 16, 1993; 60 FR 16045, Mar. 29, 1995; 60 FR 25120, May 11, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56017, Oct. 28, 1997; 64 FR 23179, Apr. 30, 1999; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 67 FR 68022, Nov. 8, 2002; 71 FR 29773, May 24, 2006]

§ 93.404 - Import permits for ruminants and for ruminant test specimens for diagnostic purposes; and reservation fees for space at quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS.

(a) Application for permit; reservation required. (1) For ruminants and ruminant test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes intended for importation from any part of the world, except as otherwise provided for in §§ 93.417, 93.422, and 93.424, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit. The application shall specify the name and address of the importer; the species, breed, number or quantity of ruminants or ruminant test specimens to be imported; the purpose of the importation; individual ruminant identification, which includes a description of the ruminant, name, age, markings, if any, registration number, if any, and tattoo or eartag; the region of origin; for cattle, the address of or other means of identifying the premises of the herd of origin and any other premises where the cattle resided prior to export, including the State or its equivalent, the municipality or nearest city, and the specific location of the premises, or an equivalent method, approved by the Administrator, of identifying the location of the premises; the name and address of the exporter; the port of embarkation in the foreign region; the mode of transportation, route of travel, and the port of entry in the United States; the name and address of the quarantine facility, if the ruminants are to be quarantined at a privately owned quarantine facility; the proposed date of arrival of the ruminants or ruminant test specimens to be imported; and the name of the person to whom the ruminants or ruminant test specimens will be delivered and the location of the place in the United States to which delivery will be made from the port of entry. Additional information may be required in the form of certificates concerning specific diseases to which the ruminants are susceptible, as well as vaccinations or other precautionary treatments to which the ruminants or ruminant test specimens have been subjected. Notice of any such requirement will be given to the applicant in each case.

(2) In addition to the requirements in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, the importer must submit the following information along with the application for an import permit:

(i) For sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter, or for restricted feeding for slaughter:

(A) The slaughter establishment to which the animals will be imported; or

(B) The designated feedlot in which sheep and goats imported for restricted feeding for slaughter will be maintained until moved to slaughter.

(ii) For sheep and goats imported for purposes other than immediate slaughter or restricted feeding for slaughter:

(A) The flock identification number, if imported to a flock, and the premises or location identification number, of the flock or other premises to which the animals are imported as listed in the Scrapie National Database.

(B) For sheep and goats from regions not free from classical scrapie, the importer must provide documentation that the animal has reached and maintained certified status in a scrapie flock certification program determined by the Administrator to provide equivalent risk reduction as the Export Category of the U.S. Scrapie Flock Certification Program. The documentation must specify the address, or other means of identification, of the premises and flock of birth, and any other flock(s) in which the animals have resided.

(3) An application for permit to import will be denied for domestic ruminants from any region designated in § 94.1 of this chapter as a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists.

(4) An application for permit to import ruminants may also be denied because of: Communicable disease conditions in the area or region of origin, or in a region where the shipment has been or will be held or through which the shipment has been or will be transported; deficiencies in the regulatory programs for the control or eradication of animal diseases and the unavailability of veterinary services in the above mentioned regions; the importer's failure to provide satisfactory evidence concerning the origin, history, and health status of the ruminants; the lack of satisfactory information necessary to determine that the importation will not be likely to transmit any communicable disease to livestock or poultry of the United States; or any other circumstances which the Administrator believes require such denial to prevent the dissemination of any communicable disease of livestock or poultry into the United States.

(5) In specific cases, a permit may be issued for ruminants that would otherwise be prohibited importation due to TSEs pursuant to this subpart, if the Administrator determines the disease risk posed by the animals can be adequately mitigated through pre-entry or post-entry mitigation measures, or through combinations of such measures. These measures will be specified in the permit. If it is determined prior to or after importation that any pre-entry or post-entry requirements were not met, or the ruminants are affected with or have been exposed to TSEs, the ruminants, their progeny, and any other ruminants that have been housed with or exposed to the ruminants will be disposed of or otherwise handled as directed by the Administrator. Importers seeking a permit pursuant to this paragraph (a)(5) must send their request to the Administrator, c/o Strategy and Policy, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231, or via the APHIS website at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/live_animals.shtml.

(6) The Administrator may issue permits under paragraph (a)(5) of this section for male sheep determined to be AA at codon 136 and either RR, HR, KR, or QR at codon 171 and for female sheep determined to be AA at codon 136 and RR at codon 171 by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories or another laboratory approved by the Administrator. Such sheep must meet all requirements in this part for import other than the requirement that they originate in a flock or region free of classical scrapie. The permit will provide for post entry confirmation of the animal's scrapie susceptibility genotype and/or genetic testing for identity.

(7)(i) The importer or importer's agent shall pay or ensure payment of a reservation fee for each lot of ruminants to be quarantined in a facility maintained by USDA. For ruminants, the reservation fee shall be 100 percent of the cost of providing care, feed, and handling during quarantine, as estimated by the quarantine facility's veterinarian in charge.

(ii) At the time the importer or the importer's agent requests a reservation of quarantine space, the importer or importer's agent shall pay the reservation fee by check or U.S. money order or ensure payment of the reservation fee by an irrevocable letter of credit from a commercial bank (the effective date on such letter of credit shall run to 30 days after the date the ruminants are scheduled to be released from quarantine); except that anyone who issues a check to the Department for a reservation fee which is returned because of insufficient funds shall be denied any further request for reservation of a quarantine space until the outstanding amount is paid.

(iii) Any reservation fee paid by check or U.S. money order shall be applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made. Any part of the reservation fee which remains unused after being applied against the expenses incurred for services received by the importer or the importer's agent in connection with the quarantine for which the reservation was made, shall be returned to the individual who paid the reservation fee. If the reservation fee is ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless payment for services received by the importer or importer's agent in connection with the quarantine is otherwise made at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(iv) Any reservation fee shall be forfeited if the importer or the importer's agent fails to present for entry, within 24 hours following the designated time of arrival, the lot of ruminants for which the reservation was made: Except that a reservation fee shall not be forfeited if:

(A) Written notice of cancellation from the importer or the importer's agent is received by the office of the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility 6 during regular business hours (8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays) no later than 15 days for ruminants prior to the beginning of the time of importation as specified in the import permit or as arranged with the veterinarian in charge of the quarantine facility if no import permit is required (the 15 days period shall not include Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays), or

6 The addresses of USDA quarantine facilities may be found in telephone directories listing the facilities or by contacting the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Strategy and Policy, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737-1231.

(B) The Administrator determines that services, other than provided by carriers, necessary for the importation of the ruminants within the requested period are unavailable because of unforeseen circumstances as determined by the Administrator, (such as the closing of an airport due to inclement weather or the unavailability of the reserved space due to the extension of another quarantine).

(v) If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit and the fee is to be forfeited under paragraph (a)(7)(iv) of this section, the Department will draw against the letter of credit unless the reservation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(vi) When a reservation is cancelled in accordance with paragraph (a)(7)(iv)(A) of this section and the provisions of paragraph (a)(7)(iv)(B) of this section do not apply, a $40.00 cancellation fee shall be charged. If a reservation fee was paid, the cancellation fee shall be deducted from any reservation fee returned to the importer or the importer's agent. If the reservation fee was ensured by a letter of credit, the Department will draw the amount of the cancellation fee against the letter of credit unless the cancellation fee is otherwise paid at least 3 days prior to the expiration date of the letter of credit.

(b) Permit. When a permit is issued, the original and two copies will be sent to the importer. It shall be the responsibility of the importer to forward the original permit and one copy to the shipper in the region of origin, and it shall also be the responsibility of the importer to insure that the shipper presents the copy of the permit to the carrier and makes proper arrangements for the original permit to accompany the shipment to the specified U.S. port of entry for presentation to the collector of customs. Ruminants and ruminant test specimens for diagnostic screening purposes for ruminants intended for importation into the United States for which a permit has been issued, will be received at the specified port of entry within the time prescribed in the permit which shall not exceed 14 days from the first day that the permit is effective for all permits. Ruminants and ruminant test specimens for which a permit is required by these regulations will not be eligible for entry if a permit has not been issued; if unaccompanied by such a permit; if shipment is from any port other than the one designated in the permit; if arrival in the United States is at any port other than the one designated in the permit; if the ruminants or ruminant test specimens offered for entry differ from those described in the permit; if the ruminants or ruminant test specimens are not handled as outlined in the application for the permit and as specified in the permit issued; or if ruminants or swine other than those covered by import permits are aboard the transporting carrier.

(c) Wild ruminants from regions where foot-and-mouth disease exists. This paragraph (c) applies to the importation of wild ruminants, such as, but not limited to, giraffes, deer and antelopes, from regions designated in part 94 of this subchapter as countries in which foot-and-mouth disease exists.

(1) Permits for the importation of wild ruminants will be issued only for importations through the Port of New York, and only if the animals are imported for exhibition in a PEQ Zoo. A PEQ Zoo is a zoological park or other place maintained for the exhibition of live animals for recreational or educational purposes that:

(i) Has been approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph (c)(2) of this section to receive and maintain imported wild ruminants; and

(ii) Has entered into the agreement with APHIS set forth in paragraph (c)(4) of this section for the maintenance and handling of imported wild ruminants.

(2) Approval of a PEQ Zoo shall be on the basis of an inspection, by an authorized representative of the Department, of the physical facilities of the establishment and its methods of operation. Standards for acceptable physical facilities shall include satisfactory pens, cages, or enclosures in which the imported ruminants can be maintained so as not to be in contact with the general public and free from contact with domestic livestock; natural or established drainage from the PEQ Zoo which will avoid contamination of land areas where domestic livestock are kept or with which domestic livestock may otherwise come in contact; provision for the disposition of manure, other wastes, and dead ruminants within the PEQ Zoo; and other reasonable facilities considered necessary to prevent the dissemination of diseases from the PEQ Zoo. The operator of the PEQ Zoo shall have available the services of a full-time or part-time veterinarian, or a veterinarian on a retainer basis, who shall make periodic examinations of all animals maintained at the PEQ Zoo for evidence of disease; who shall make a post-mortem examination of each animal that dies; and who shall make a prompt report of suspected cases of contagious or communicable diseases to an APHIS representative or the State agency responsible for livestock disease control programs.

(3) Manure and other animal wastes must be disposed of within the PEQ Zoo park for a minimum of one year following the date an imported wild ruminant enters the zoo. If an APHIS veterinarian determines that an imported ruminant shows no signs of any communicable disease or exposure to any such disease during this 1-year period, its manure and other wastes need not be disposed of within the zoo after the 1-year period. If, however, an APHIS veterinarian determines that an imported ruminant does show signs of any communicable disease during this 1-year period, an APHIS veterinarian will investigate the disease and determine whether the ruminant's manure and other wastes may safely be disposed of outside the zoo after the 1-year period has ended.

(4) Prior to the issuance of an import permit under this section, the operator of the approved PEQ Zoo to which the imported ruminants are to be consigned, and the importer of the ruminants, if such operator and importer are different parties, shall execute an agreement covering each ruminant or group of ruminants for which the import permit is requested. The agreement shall be in the following form:

Agreement for the Importation, Quarantine and Exhibition of Certain Wild Ruminants and Wild Swine

________, operator(s) of the zoological park known as ____________________ (Name) located at ____________________ (City and state), and ____________________ (Importer) hereby request a permit for the importation of ________ (Number and kinds of animals) for exhibition purposes at the said zoological park, said animals originating in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists and being subject to restrictions under regulations contained in part 93, title 9, Code of Federal Regulations.

In making this request, it is understood and agreed that:

1. The animals for which an import permit is requested will be held in isolation at a port of embarkation in the region of origin, approved by the Administrator as a port having facilities which are adequate for maintaining wild animals in isolation from all other animals and having veterinary supervision by officials of the region of origin of the animals. Such animals will be held in such isolation for not less than 60 days under the supervision of the veterinary service of that region to determine whether the animals show any clinical evidence of foot-and-mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and to assure that the animals will not have been exposed to such a disease within the 60 days next before their exportation from that region.

2. Shipment will be made direct from such port of embarkation to the port of New York as the sole port of entry in the United States. If shipment is made by ocean vessel the animals will not be unloaded in any foreign port en route. If shipment is made by air, the animals will not be unloaded at any port or other place of landing, except at a port approved by the Administrator as a port not located in a region where foot-and-mouth disease exists or as a port in such a region having facilities and inspection adequate for maintaining wild animals in isolation from all other animals.

3. No ruminants or swine will be aboard the transporting vehicle, vessel or aircraft, except those for which an import permit has been issued.

4. The animals will be quarantined for not less than 30 days in the Department's Animal Import Center in Newburgh, New York.

5. Upon release from quarantine the animals will be delivered to the zoological park named in this agreement to become the property of the park and they will not be sold, exchanged or removed from the premises without the prior consent of APHIS. If moved to another zoological park in the United States, the receiving zoological park must be approved by the Administrator in accordance with paragraph 6 of this agreement.

6. The Administrator will approve the movement of an imported animal subject to this agreement if the Administrator determines that the animal has spent at least one year in quarantine in a PEQ Zoo following importation without showing clinical evidence of foot-and-foot mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and determines that the receiving zoological park is accredited by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA), or the receiving zoological park has facilities and procedures in place related to preventing the spread of communicable animal diseases (including but not limited to procedures for animal identification, record keeping, and veterinary care) that are equivalent to those required for AZA accreditation. The Administrator will approve the movement of a carcass, body part, or biological specimen derived from an imported animal subject to this agreement if the Administrator determines that the animal has spent at least one year in quarantine in a PEQ Zoo following importation without showing clinical evidence of foot-and-foot mouth disease, or other communicable disease that is exotic to the United States or for which APHIS has an eradication or control program in 9 CFR chapter I, and determines that the carcass, body part, or biological specimen will be moved only for scientific research or museum display purposes.

(Signature of importer)

Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of ____, ____.

(Title or designation) (Name of zoological park) By (Signature of officer of zoological park) (Title of officer)

Subscribed and sworn to before me this ____ day of ____,____

(Title or designation)
(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0224, and 0579-0453) [55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 59 FR 28216, June 1, 1994; 59 FR 31924, June 21, 1994; 59 FR 67615, Dec. 30, 1994; 62 FR 23637, May 1, 1997. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 65 FR 38178, June 20, 2000; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 68 FR 35533, June 16, 2003; 71 FR 29773, May 24, 2006; 83 FR 15492, Apr. 11, 2018; 86 FR 45624, Aug. 16, 2021; 86 FR 68857, Dec. 3, 2021]

§ 93.405 - Health certificate for ruminants.

(a) Issuance and required information. All ruminants intended for importation from any part of the world, except as provided in §§ 93.423(c) and 93.428(d), shall be accompanied by a certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or issued by a veterinarian designated or accredited by the national government of the region of origin and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so. The certificate shall state:

(1) That the ruminants have been kept in that region during the last 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment to the United States, and that during this time the region has been entirely free from foot-and-mouth disease, contagious pleuropneumonia, and surra; provided, however, that for wild ruminants for exhibition purposes, the certificate need specify only that the district of origin has been free from the listed diseases; and provided further, that for sheep and goats, with respect to contagious pleuropneumonia, the certificate may specify only that the district of origin has been free from this disease;

(2) That the ruminants are not in quarantine in the region of origin; and

(3) If the ruminants are from any region where screwworm is considered to exist, the ruminants may be imported into the United States only if they meet the requirements of paragraphs (a)(3)(i) through (iv) of this section and all other applicable requirements of this part. APHIS maintains a list of regions where screwworm is considered to exist on the APHIS website at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-and-animal-product-import-information/animal-health-status-of-regions. Copies of the list can be obtained via postal mail or email upon request to Regionalization Evaluation Services, Strategy and Policy, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road, Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737; AskRegionalization@usda.gov. APHIS will add a region to the list upon determining that screwworm exists in the region based on reports APHIS receives of detections of the pest from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), or from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable. APHIS will remove a region from the list after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with § 92.2 of this subchapter and finding that screwworm is not present in the region. In the case of a region formerly not on this list that is added due to a detection, the region may be removed from the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in § 92.4 of this subchapter.

(i) A veterinarian must treat the ruminants with ivermectin 3 to 5 days prior to the date of export to the United States according to the recommended dose prescribed on the product's label.

(ii) The ruminants must be fully examined for screwworm by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country within 24 hours prior to shipment to the United States. If ruminants are found to be infested with screwworm, they must be treated until free from infestation.

(iii) At the time ruminants are loaded onto a means of conveyance for export, a veterinarian must treat any visible wounds on the animals with a solution of coumaphos dust at a concentration of 5 percent active ingredient.

(iv) The ruminants must be accompanied to the United States by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried veterinary official of the exporting country. The certificate must state that the ruminants have been thoroughly examined and found free of screwworm and that the ruminants have been treated in accordance with paragraphs (a)(3)(i) and (a)(3)(iii) of this section.

(b) Sheep and goats—(1) Information required. In addition to the statements required by paragraph (a) of this section, the certificate accompanying sheep or goats from any part of the world must also include the name and address of the importer; the number or quantity of sheep or goats to be imported; the purpose of the importation; the official individual sheep or goat identification applied to the animals; and, when required by § 93.435, the permanent country mark and other identification present on the animal, including registration number, if any; a description of each sheep or goat linked to the official identification number, including age, sex, breed, color, and markings, if any; the flock of residence; the address (including street, city, State, and ZIP Code) of the destination where the sheep or goats are to be physically located after importation, including the premises or location identification number assigned in the APHIS National Scrapie Database and when applicable the flock identification number; the name and address of the exporter; the port of embarkation in the region of export; the mode of transportation, route of travel and port of entry in the United States; and, for sheep or goats imported for purposes other than immediate slaughter or restricted feeding for slaughter, the certificate must specify the region of origin and, for regions not free of scrapie, the address or other identification of the premises and flock of birth, and any other flock in which the animals have resided.

(2) Additional statements. The certificate accompanying sheep or goats from any part of the world, except as provided in paragraph (b)(4) of this section for sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter, and in paragraph (b)(5) of this section for sheep or goats for restricted feeding for slaughter, must also state that:

(i) The sheep or goats originated from a region recognized as free of classical scrapie by APHIS; or the animals have reached and maintained certified status or equivalent status in a scrapie flock certification program or equivalent program approved by APHIS;

(ii) The sheep or goats have not commingled with sheep or goats of a lower health status, or resided on the premises of a flock or herd of lower health status, after leaving the flock of residence and prior to arrival in the United States;

(iii) Any enclosure, container or conveyance in which the sheep or goats had been placed during the export process, and which had previously held sheep or goats, was cleaned and disinfected in accordance with § 54.7(e)(2) of this chapter prior to being used for the sheep or goats;

(iv) None of the female sheep or goats is carrying an implanted embryo from a lower health status flock; or that any implanted embryo meets the requirements for import into the United States when implanted, and documentation as required in part 98 of this subchapter is attached;

(v) The veterinarian issuing the certificate has inspected the sheep or goats, and their flock(s) of residence, within 30 days of consignment for import to the United States, and found the animals and the flock(s) of residence to be free of any evidence of infectious or contagious disease;

(vi) As far as it is possible for the veterinarian who inspects the animals to determine, none of the sheep or goats in the flock(s) of residence has been exposed to any infectious or contagious disease during the 60 days immediately preceding shipment to the United States; and

(vii) The animals' movement is not restricted within the country of origin due to animal health reasons.

(3) Test results. The certificate accompanying sheep or goats from any part of the world, except as provided in paragraph (b)(4) of this section for sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter, or in paragraph (b)(5) of this section for sheep or goats for restricted feeding for slaughter, must also include:

(i) The results of any testing required in the import permit; and

(ii) Any other information required in the import permit.

(4) Sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter. For sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter, in addition to the statements required under paragraph (a) of this section, the certificate must include statements that:

(i) The region where the sheep or goats originated is recognized as free of classical scrapie by APHIS; or

(ii) The region where the sheep or goats originated has not been recognized as free of classical scrapie by APHIS but the following criteria have been met:

(A) TSEs in sheep and goats are compulsorily notifiable to the national veterinary authority of the region;

(B) An effective classical scrapie awareness, surveillance, monitoring, and control system is in place;

(C) TSE-affected sheep and goats are killed and completely destroyed;

(D) The sheep and goats selected for export showed no clinical sign of scrapie on the day of shipment and are fit for travel;

(E) The sheep and goats have not tested positive for, and are not suspect for, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy; and

(F) The animals' movement is not restricted within the country of origin due to animal health reasons.

(5) Sheep or goats for restricted feeding for slaughter. For sheep or goats imported for restricted feeding for slaughter, in addition to the statements required under paragraph (a) of this section, the certificate must include statements that:

(i) The region where the sheep or goats originated is recognized as free of classical scrapie by APHIS; or

(ii) The region where the sheep or goats originated has not been recognized as free of classical scrapie by APHIS but the following criteria have been met:

(A) TSEs in sheep and goats are compulsorily notifiable to the national veterinary authority of the region;

(B) An effective classical scrapie awareness, surveillance, monitoring and control system is in place;

(C) TSE-affected sheep and goats are killed and completely destroyed;

(D) The sheep or goats showed no clinical sign of scrapie or any other infectious disease on the day of shipment and are fit for travel;

(E) The sheep or goats have not tested positive for, and are not suspect for, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy;

(F) The animals' movement is not restricted within the country of origin due to animal health concerns;

(G) Female sheep and goats are not known to be pregnant, are not visibly pregnant, and female animals have not been exposed:

(1) To a sexually intact male at over 5 months of age; or

(2) To a sexually intact male within 5 months of shipment;

(H) The veterinarian issuing the certificate has inspected the sheep or goats for export, and their flock(s) of residence, within 30 days of consignment for shipment to the United States, and found the animals and the flock(s) of residence to be free of any evidence of infectious or contagious disease; and

(I) As far as it is possible for the veterinarian who inspects the animals to determine, none of the sheep or goats has been exposed to any infectious or contagious disease during the 60 days immediately preceding shipment to the United States.

(c) Refusal of entry. If ruminants are unaccompanied by the certificate as required by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, or if such ruminants are found upon inspection at the port of entry to be affected with a communicable disease or to have been exposed thereto, they shall be refused entry and shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0165, 0579-0234, 0579-0393, and 0579-0453) [55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997] Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 93.405, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

§ 93.406 - Diagnostic tests.

(a) [Reserved]

(b) Tuberculosis and brucellosis tests of goats. Except as provided in §§ 93.428(b) and 93.435, all goats offered for importation, except for immediate slaughter, shall be accompanied by a satisfactory certificate of a salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the region of origin, or if exported from Mexico, shall be accompanied either by such a certificate or by a certificate issued by a veterinarian accredited by the National Government of Mexico and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the National Government of Mexico, thereby representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, showing that the goats have been tested for tuberculosis and brucellosis with negative results within 30 days of the date of their exportation. The said certificate shall give the dates and places of testing, method of testing, names of consignor and consignee, and a description of the goats, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers.

(c)-(d) [Reserved]

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 28080, June 24, 1992; 58 FR 68509, Dec. 28, 1993. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 66 FR 20190, Apr. 20, 2001; 68 FR 35533, June 16, 2003; 69 FR 21042, Apr. 20, 2004; 85 FR 57952, Sept. 17, 2020; 86 FR 68859, Dec. 3, 2021]

§ 93.407 - Declaration and other documents for ruminants.

(a) The certificates, declarations, and affidavits required by the regulations in this part shall be presented by the importer or his or her agent to the collector of customs at the port of entry, upon arrival of ruminants at such port, for the use of the veterinary inspector at the port of entry.

(b) For all ruminants offered for importation, the importer or his or her agent shall first present two copies of a declaration which shall list the port of entry, the name and address of the importer, the name and address of the broker, the origin of the ruminants, the number, breed, species, and purpose of the importation, the name of the person to whom the ruminants will be delivered, and the location of the place to which such delivery will be made.

(c) Any declaration, permit, or other document for ruminants required under this subpart may be issued and presented using a U.S. Government electronic information exchange system or other authorized method.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 81 FR 40151, June 21, 2016]

§ 93.408 - Inspection at the port of entry.

Inspection shall be made at the port of entry of all ruminants imported from any part of the world except as provided in § 93.421. All ruminants found to be free from communicable disease and not to have been exposed thereto within 60 days prior to their exportation to the United States shall be admitted subject to the other provisions in this part; all other ruminants except as provided in §§ 93.423(c) and 93.427(a) shall be refused entry. Ruminants refused entry, unless exported within a time fixed in each case by the Administrator, and in accordance with other provisions he or she may require in each case for their handling shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct in accordance with the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.). Such portions of the transporting vessel, and of its cargo, which have been exposed to any such ruminants or their emanations shall be disinfected in such manner as may be considered necessary by the inspector in charge at the port of entry, to prevent the introduction or spread of livestock or poultry disease, before the cargo is allowed to land.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56018, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 85 FR 57952, Sept. 17, 2020]

§ 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

No litter or manure, fodder or other aliment, nor any equipment such as boxes, buckets, ropes, chains, blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall be landed from any conveyance except under such restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry shall direct.

§ 93.410 - Movement from conveyances to quarantine station.

Platforms and chutes used for handling imported ruminants shall be cleaned and disinfected under APHIS supervision after being so used. The said ruminants shall not be unnecessarily moved over any highways nor allowed to come in contact with other animals, but shall be transferred from the conveyance to the quarantine grounds in boats, cars, or vehicles approved by the inspector in charge at the port of entry. Such cars, boats, or vehicles shall be cleaned and disinfected under APHIS supervision immediately after such use, by the carrier moving the same. The railway cars so used shall be either cars reserved for this exclusive use or box cars not otherwise employed in the transportation of animals or their fresh products. When movement of the aforesaid ruminants upon or across a public highway is unavoidable, it shall be under such careful supervision and restrictions as the inspector in charge at the port of entry and the local authorities may direct.

§ 93.411 - Quarantine requirements.

(a) Except for cattle from Central America and the West Indies, and except for ruminants from Canada and Mexico, all ruminants imported into the United States shall be quarantined for not less than 30 days counting from the date of arrival at the port of entry.

(b) Wild ruminants shall be subject, during their quarantine, to such inspections, disinfection, blood tests, or other tests as may be required by the Administrator to determine their freedom from disease.

[61 FR 17238, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997]

§ 93.412 - Ruminant quarantine facilities.

(a) Privately owned quarantine facilities. The operator of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility subject to the regulations in this subpart shall arrange for acceptable transportation from the port to the privately owned quarantine facility and for the care, feeding, and handling of the ruminants from the time of unloading at the port to the time of release from the quarantine facility. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. All expenses related to these activities shall be the responsibility of the operator. The privately owned quarantine facility must be suitable for the quarantine of the ruminants and must be approved by the Administrator prior to the issuance of any import permit. The facilities occupied by the ruminants should be kept clean and sanitary to the satisfaction of the APHIS representatives. If for any cause, the care, feeding, or handling of ruminants, or the sanitation of the facilities is neglected, in the opinion of the overseeing APHIS representative, such services may be furnished by APHIS in the same manner as though arrangements had been made for such services as provided by paragraph (b) of this section. The operator must request in writing inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claims against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS for damages which may arise from such services. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When APHIS finds it necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, APHIS shall advise the operator in writing, and the operator must pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. The operator must pay for all services received in connection with each separate lot of ruminants as specified in the compliance agreement required under paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(b) Quarantine facilities maintained by APHIS. The importer, or his or her agent, of ruminants subject to quarantine under the regulations in this part shall arrange for acceptable transportation to the quarantine facility, and for the care, feed, and handling of the ruminants from the time they arrive at the quarantine port to the time of release from quarantine. Such arrangements shall be agreed to in advance by the Administrator. The importer or his or her agent shall request in writing such inspection and other services as may be required, and shall waive all claim against the United States and APHIS or any employee of APHIS, for damages which may arise from such services. All expenses resulting therefrom or incident thereto shall be the responsibility of the importer; APHIS assumes no responsibility with respect thereto. The Administrator may prescribe reasonable rates for the services provided under this paragraph. When it is found necessary to extend the usual minimum quarantine period, the importer, or his or her agent, shall be so advised in writing and shall pay for such additional quarantine and other services required. Payment for services received by the importer, or his or her agent, in connection with each separate lot of ruminants shall be made by certified check or U.S. money order prior to release of the ruminants. If such payment is not made, the ruminants may be sold in accordance with the procedure described in this paragraph or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Administrator. When payment is not made and the ruminants are to be sold to recover payment for services received, the importer, or his or her agent, will be notified by the inspector that if said charges are not immediately paid or satisfactory arrangements made for payment, the ruminants will be sold at public sale to pay the expense of care, feed, and handling during that period. The sale will be held after the expiration of the quarantine period, at such time and place as may be designated by the General Services Administration or other designated selling agent. The proceeds of the sale, after deducting the charges for care, feed, and handling of the ruminants and other expenses, including the expense of the sale, shall be held in a Special Deposit Account in the United States Treasury for 6 months from the date of sale. If not claimed by the importer, or his or her agent, within 6 months from the date of sale, the amount so held shall be transferred from the Special Deposit Account to the General Fund Account in the United States Treasury.

(c) APHIS collection of payments from the importer, or his or her agent, or the operator, for service rendered shall be deposited so as to be available for defraying the expenses involved in this service.

(d) Standards for privately owned quarantine facilities for ruminants—(1) APHIS approval of facilities—(i) Approval procedures. Persons seeking APHIS approval of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility for ruminants must make written application to the Administrator, c/o Strategy and Policy, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231. The application must include the full name and mailing address of the applicant; the location and street address of the facility for which approval is sought; blueprints of the facility; a description of the financial resources available for construction, operation and maintenance of the facility; copies of all approved State permits for construction and operation of the facility (but not local building permits), as well as copies of all approved Federal, State, and local environmental permits; the anticipated source(s) or origin(s) of ruminants to be quarantined, as well as the expected size and frequency of shipments, and a contingency plan for the possible destruction and disposal of all ruminants capable of being held in the facility.

(A) If APHIS determines that an application is complete and merits further consideration, the person applying for facility approval must agree to pay the costs of all APHIS services associated with APHIS' evaluation of the application and facility. APHIS charges for evaluation services at hourly rates are listed in part 130 of this chapter. If the facility is approved by APHIS, the operator must enter into a compliance agreement in accordance with paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(B) Requests for approval must be submitted at least 120 days prior to the date of application for local building permits. Requests for approval will be evaluated on a first-come, first-served basis.

(ii) Criteria for approval. Before a facility may be built to operate as a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility for ruminants, it must be approved by APHIS. To be approved:

(A) APHIS must find, based on an environmental assessment, and based on any required Federal, State, and local environmental permits or evaluations secured by the operator and copies of which are provided to APHIS, that the operation of the facility will not have significant environmental effects;

(B) The facility must meet all the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section;

(C) The facility must meet any additional requirements that may be imposed by the Administrator in each specific case, as specified in the compliance agreement required under paragraph (d)(2) of this section, to ensure that the quarantine of ruminants in the facility will be adequate to enable determination of their health status, as well as to prevent the transmission of livestock diseases into, within, and from the facility; and

(D) The Administrator must determine whether sufficient personnel, including one or more APHIS veterinarians and other professional, technical, and support personnel, are available to serve as APHIS representatives at the facility and provide continuous oversight and other technical services to ensure the biological security of the facility, if approved. APHIS will assign personnel to facilities requesting approval in the order that the facilities meet all of the criteria for approval. The Administrator has sole discretion on the number of APHIS personnel to be assigned to the facility.

(iii) Maintaining approval. To maintain APHIS approval, the operator must continue to comply with all the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section as well as the terms of the compliance agreement executed in accordance with paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(iv) Withdrawal or denial of approval. Approval of a proposed privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility may be denied or approval of a facility already in operation may be withdrawn at any time by the Administrator for any of the reasons provided in paragraph (d)(1)(iv)(C) of this section.

(A) Before facility approval is denied or withdrawn, APHIS will inform the operator of the proposed or existing facility and include the reasons for the proposed action. If there is a conflict as to any material fact, APHIS will afford the operator, upon request, the opportunity for a hearing with respect to the merits or validity of such action in accordance with rules of practice that APHIS adopts for the proceeding.

(B) Withdrawal of approval of an existing facility will become effective pending final determination in the proceeding when the Administrator determines that such action is necessary to protect the public health, interest, or safety. Such withdrawal will be effective upon oral or written notification, whichever is earlier, to the operator of the facility. In the event of oral notification, APHIS will give written confirmation to the operator of the facility as promptly as circumstances allow. This withdrawal will continue in effect pending the completion of the proceeding and any judicial review, unless otherwise ordered by the Administrator. In addition to withdrawal of approval for the reasons provided in paragraph (d)(1)(iv)(C) of this section, the Administrator will also automatically withdraw approval when the operator of any approved facility notifies the area veterinarian in charge for the State in which the facility is located, in writing, that the facility is no longer in operation. 7

7 The name and address of the area veterinarian in charge in any State is available from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Strategy and Policy, 4700 River road Unit 39, Riverdale, MD 20737-1231.

(C) The Administrator may deny or withdraw the approval of a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility if:

(1) Any requirement of paragraph (d) of this section or the compliance agreement is not met; or

(2) The facility has not been in use to quarantine ruminants for a period of at least 1 year; or

(3) The operator fails to remit any charges for APHIS services rendered; or

(4) The operator or a person responsibly connected with the business of the facility is or has been convicted of any crime under any law regarding the importation or quarantine of any animal; or

(5) The operator or a person responsibly connected with the business of the facility is or has been convicted of a crime involving fraud, bribery, extortion, or any other crime involving a lack of integrity needed for the conduct of operations affecting the importation of animals; or

(6) Any other requirement under the Animal Health Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8301-8317) or the regulations thereunder are not met.

(D) For the purposes of paragraph (d)(1)(iv) of this section, a person is deemed to be responsibly connected with the business of the facility if such person has an ownership, mortgage, or lease interest in the facility, or if such person is a partner, officer, director, holder, or owner of 10 percent or more of its voting stock, or an employee in a managerial or executive capacity.

(2) Compliance agreement. (i) A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must operate in accordance with a compliance agreement executed by the operator or other designated representative of the facility and by the Administrator. The compliance agreement must be signed by both parties before a facility may commence operations. The compliance agreement must provide that:

(A) The facility must meet all applicable requirements of paragraph (d) of this section;

(B) The facility's quarantine operations are subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives;

(C) The operator agrees to be responsible for the cost of building the facility; all costs associated with its maintenance and operation; all costs associated with the hiring of personnel to attend to the ruminants, as well as to maintain and operate the facility; all costs associated with the care of quarantined ruminants, such as feed, bedding, medicines, inspections, testing, laboratory procedures, and necropsy examinations; all costs associated with the death or destruction and disposition of quarantined ruminants; and all APHIS charges for the services of APHIS representatives in accordance with this section and part 130 of this chapter;

(D) The operator obtained, prior to execution of this agreement, a financial instrument (insurance or surety bond) approved by APHIS that financially guarantees the operator's ability to cover all costs and other financial liabilities and obligations of the facility, including a worst case scenario in which all quarantined ruminants must be destroyed and disposed of because of an animal health emergency, as determined by the Administrator.

(E) The operator will deposit with the Administrator, prior to commencing quarantine operations, a certified check or U.S. money order to cover the estimated costs, as determined by the Administrator, of professional, technical, and support services to be provided by APHIS at the facility over the duration of the quarantine. If actual costs incurred by APHIS over the quarantine period exceed the deposited amount, the operator will pay for any additional costs incurred by APHIS, based on official accounting records. Payment for all services received in connection with each lot of ruminants in quarantine shall be made prior to release of the ruminants. The operator must pay for any other costs incurred by APHIS with respect to the quarantine following the release of the ruminants, based on official records, within 14 days of receipt of the bill showing the balance due. APHIS will return to the operator any unobligated funds deposited with APHIS, after the release of the lot of ruminants from the facility and termination or expiration of the compliance agreement, or, if requested, credit to the operator's account such funds to be applied towards payment of APHIS services at a future date.

(ii) Prior to the entry of each subsequent lot of ruminants into the medium or minimum security facility, a new compliance agreement must be executed, and a certified check or U.S. money order to the Administrator must be deposited to cover the estimated costs, as determined by the Administrator, of professional, technical, and support services to be provided by APHIS at the facility over the duration of the quarantine.

(3) Physical plant requirements. A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must meet the following requirements as determined by an APHIS inspection before ruminants may be admitted to it.

(i) Location. (A) The medium or minimum security facility must be located at a site approved by the Administrator, and the specific routes for the movement of ruminants from the port must be approved in advance by the Administrator, based on consideration of whether the site or routes would put the animals in a position that could result in their transmitting communicable livestock diseases.

(B) In the case of a medium security facility, the facility must be located at least one-half mile from any premises holding livestock. In the case of a minimum security facility, the Administrator will establish the required minimum distance between the facility and other premises holding livestock on a case-by-case basis.

(C) If the medium or minimum security facility is to be located more than 1 mile from a designated port, the operator must make arrangements for the imported ruminants to be held in a temporary inspection facility to allow for the inspection of the imported ruminants by a Federal or State veterinarian prior to the animals' movement to the medium or minimum security facility.

(1) The temporary inspection facility must have adequate space for Federal or State veterinarians to conduct examinations and testing of the imported ruminants.

(2) The examination space of the temporary inspection facility must be equipped with appropriate animal restraining devices for the safe inspection of ruminants.

(3) The temporary inspection facility may not hold more than one lot of animals at the same time.

(4) In seeking APHIS approval of the temporary inspection facility, the operator must provide APHIS with the following information: The port of entry; a description of the temporary inspection facility; and the anticipated source(s) of the materials to be used for the facility.

(5) If the ruminants, upon inspection at the temporary inspection facility, are determined to be infected with or exposed to a disease that precludes their entry into the United States, the animals will be refused entry. Ruminants refused entry remain the responsibility of the operator, but subject to further handling or disposition as directed by the Administrator in accordance with § 93.408 of this subpart.

(6) APHIS' approval to build and operate a medium or minimum security facility outside the immediate vicinity of a designated port is contingent upon APHIS' approval of the temporary inspection facility at the port, as well as approval of the routes for the movement of ruminants from the port to the medium or minimum security facility.

(ii) Construction. The medium or minimum security facility must be of sound construction, in good repair, and properly designed to prevent the escape of quarantined ruminants. It must have adequate capacity to receive and hold a shipment of ruminants as a lot on an “all-in, all-out” basis and must include the following:

(A) Loading docks. The facility must include separate docks for animal receiving and releasing and for general receiving and pickup, or, alternatively, a single dock may be used for both purposes if the dock is cleaned and disinfected after each use in accordance with paragraph (d)(4)(iv)(D) of this section.

(B) Perimeter fencing. The facility must be surrounded by double-security perimeter fencing separated by at least 30 feet and of sufficient height and design to prevent the entry of unauthorized persons and animals from outside the facility and to prevent the escape of any ruminants in quarantine.

(C) Means of isolation. The facility must provide pens, chutes, and other animal restraining devices, as appropriate, for inspection and identification of each animal, as well as for segregation, treatment, or both, of any ruminant exhibiting signs of illness. The medium or minimum security facility must also have lot-holding areas of sufficient size to prevent overcrowding. A medium security facility may hold more than one lot of ruminants as long as the lots are separated by physical barriers such that ruminants in one lot do not have physical contact with ruminants in another lot or with their excrement or discharges. A minimum security facility may not hold more than one lot of animals at the same time.

(D) APHIS space. The facility must have adequate space for APHIS representatives to conduct examinations and draw samples for testing of ruminants in quarantine, prepare and package samples for mailing, and store duplicate samples and the necessary equipment and supplies for each lot of ruminants. The examination space must be equipped with appropriate animal restraining devices for the safe inspection of ruminants. The facility must also provide a secure, lockable office for APHIS use with enough room for a desk, chair, and filing cabinet.

(E) Storage. The facility must have sufficient storage space for equipment and supplies used in quarantine operations. Storage space must include separate, secure storage for pesticides and for medical and other biological supplies, as well as a separate storage area for feed and bedding, if feed and bedding are stored at the facility.

(F) Other work areas. The facility must include work areas for the repair of equipment and for cleaning and disinfecting equipment used in the facility.

(iii) Additional construction requirements for medium security facilities. For medium security facilities only, the following requirements must also be met:

(A) Self-contained building. The medium security facility must be constructed so that the quarantine area is located in a secure, self-contained building that contains appropriate control measures against the spread of livestock diseases biologically transmissible by vectors. All entryways into the nonquarantine area of the building must be equipped with a secure and lockable door. While ruminants are in quarantine, all access to the quarantine area must be from within the building. Each entryway to the quarantine area must be equipped with a solid self-closing door. Separate access must be provided within the quarantine area to each lot-holding area so that it is not necessary to move through one lot-holding area to gain access to another lot-holding area. Entryways to each lot-holding area within the quarantine area would also have to be equipped with a solid lockable door. Emergency exits to the outside may exist in the quarantine area if required by local fire ordinances. Such emergency exits must be constructed so as to permit their opening from the inside of the facility only.

(B) Windows and other openings. Any windows or other openings in the quarantine area must be double-screened with screening of sufficient gauge and mesh to prevent the entry or exit of insects and other vectors of livestock diseases and to provide ventilation sufficient to ensure the comfort and safety of all ruminants in the facility. The interior and exterior screens must be separated by at least 3 inches (7.62 cm). All screening of windows or other openings must be easily removable for cleaning, yet otherwise remain locked and secure at all times in a manner satisfactory to APHIS representatives in order to ensure the biological security of the facility.

(C) Surfaces. The medium security facility must be constructed so that the floor surfaces with which ruminants have contact are nonslip and wear-resistant. All floor surfaces with which the ruminants, their excrement, or discharges have contact must slope gradually to the center, where one or more drains of at least 8 inches in diameter are located for adequate drainage, or, alternatively, must be of slatted or other floor design that allows for adequate drainage. All floor and wall surfaces with which the ruminants, their excrement, or discharges have contact must be impervious to moisture and be able to withstand frequent cleaning and disinfection without deterioration. Other ceiling and wall surfaces with which the ruminants, their excrement, or discharges do not have contact must be able to withstand cleaning and disinfection between shipments of ruminants. All floor and wall surfaces must be free of sharp edges that could cause injury to ruminants.

(D) Ventilation and climate control. The medium security facility must be constructed with a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system capable of controlling and maintaining the ambient temperature, air quality, moisture, and odor at levels that are not injurious or harmful to the health of ruminants in quarantine. Air supplied to lot-holding areas must not be recirculated or reused for other ventilation needs. HVAC systems for lot-holding areas must be separate from air handling systems for other operational and administrative areas of the facility. In addition, if the facility is approved to handle more than one lot of ruminants at a time, each lot-holding area must have its own separate HVAC system that is designed to prevent cross-contamination between the separate lot-holding areas.

(E) Lighting. The medium security facility must have adequate lighting throughout, including in the lot-holding areas and other areas used to examine ruminants and conduct necropsies.

(F) Fire protection. The medium security facility, including the lot-holding areas, must have a fire alarm and voice communication system.

(G) Monitoring system. The medium security facility must have a television monitoring system or other arrangement sufficient to provide a full view of the lot-holding areas.

(H) Communication system. The medium security facility must have a communication system between the nonquarantine and quarantine areas of the facility.

(I) Necropsy area. The medium security facility must have an area that is of sufficient size to perform necropsies on ruminants and that is equipped with adequate lighting, hot and cold running water, a drain, a cabinet for storing instruments, a refrigerator-freezer for storing specimens, and an autoclave to sterilize veterinary equipment.

(J) Additional storage requirements. Feed storage areas in the medium security facility must be vermin-proof. Also, if the medium security facility has multiple lot-holding areas, then separate storage space for supplies and equipment must be provided for each lot-holding area.

(K) Showers. In a medium security facility, there must be a shower at the entrance to the quarantine area. A shower also must be located at the entrance to the necropsy area. A clothes-storage and clothes-changing area must be provided at each end of each shower area. There also must be one or more receptacles near each shower so that clothing that has been worn in a lot-holding area or elsewhere in the quarantine area can be deposited in the receptacle(s) prior to entering the shower.

(L) Restrooms. The medium security facility must have permanent restrooms in both the nonquarantine and quarantine areas of the facility.

(M) Break room. The medium security facility must have an area within the quarantine area for breaks and meals.

(N) Laundry area. The medium security facility must have an area for washing and drying clothes, linens, and towels.

(iv) Sanitation. To ensure that proper animal health and biological security measures are observed, a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must provide the following:

(A) Equipment and supplies necessary to maintain the facility in a clean and sanitary condition, including pest control equipment and supplies and cleaning and disinfecting equipment with adequate capacity to disinfect the facility and equipment.

(B) Separately maintained sanitation and pest control equipment and supplies for each lot-holding area if the facility will hold more than one lot of ruminants at a time (applicable to medium security facilities only).

(C) A supply of potable water adequate to meet all watering and cleaning needs, with water faucets for hoses located throughout the facility. An emergency supply of water for ruminants in quarantine also must be maintained.

(D) A stock of disinfectant authorized in § 71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or otherwise approved by the Administrator that is sufficient to disinfect the entire facility.

(E) The capability to dispose of wastes, including manure, urine, and used bedding, by means of burial, incineration, or public sewer. Other waste material must be handled in such a manner that minimizes spoilage and the attraction of pests and must be disposed of by incineration, public sewer, or other preapproved manner that prevents the spread of disease. Disposal of wastes must be carried out under the direct oversight of APHIS representatives.

(F) The capability to dispose of ruminant carcasses in a manner approved by the Administrator and under conditions that prevent the spread of disease from the carcasses.

(G) For incineration to be carried out at the facility, incineration equipment that is detached from other facility structures and is capable of burning wastes or carcasses as required. The incineration site must include an area sufficient for solid waste holding. Incineration may also take place at a local site away from the facility premises. All incineration activities must be carried out under the direct oversight of an APHIS representative.

(H) The capability to control surface drainage and effluent into, within, and from the facility in a manner that prevents the spread of disease into, within, and from the facility. If the facility is approved to handle more than one lot of ruminants at the same time, there must be separate drainage systems for each lot-holding area in order to prevent cross contamination.

(v) Security. (A) A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must provide the following security measures:

(1) The facility and premises must be kept locked and secure at all times while the ruminants are in quarantine.

(2) The facility and premises must have signs indicating that the facility is a quarantine area and no visitors are allowed.

(3) The operator must furnish a telephone number or numbers to APHIS at which the operator or his or her agent can be reached at all times.

(4) APHIS is authorized to place seals on any or all entrances and exits of the facility, when determined necessary by APHIS to ensure security, and to take all necessary steps to ensure that the seals are broken only in the presence of an APHIS representative. If the seals are broken by someone other than an APHIS representative, it will be considered a breach in security, and an immediate accounting of all ruminants in the facility will be made by an APHIS representative. If a breach in security occurs, APHIS may extend the quarantine period as long as necessary to determine that the ruminants are free of communicable livestock diseases.

(5) In the event that a communicable livestock disease is diagnosed in quarantined ruminants, the Administrator may require that the operator have the facility guarded by a bonded security company, at the expense of the operator of the facility, in a manner that the Administrator deems necessary to ensure the biological security of the facility.

(B) A privately owned medium security facility also must provide the following security measures:

(1) The medium security facility and premises must be guarded at all times by one or more representatives of a bonded security company, or, alternatively, the medium security facility must have an electronic security system that prevents the entry of unauthorized persons into the facility and prevents animals outside the facility from having contact with ruminants in quarantine;

(2) If an electronic security system is used, the electronic security system must be coordinated through or with the local police so that monitoring of the facility is maintained whenever APHIS representatives are not at the facility. The electronic security system must be of the “silent type” and must be triggered to ring at the monitoring site and, if the operator chooses, at the facility. The operator must provide written instructions to the monitoring agency stating that the police and an APHIS representative designated by APHIS must be notified by the monitoring agency if the alarm is triggered. The operator also must submit a copy of those instructions to the Administrator. The operator must notify the designated APHIS representative whenever a break in security occurs or is suspected of occurring.

(4) Operating procedures. The following procedures must be followed at a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility at all times:

(i) APHIS oversight. (A) The quarantine of ruminants at the facility will be subject to the strict oversight of APHIS representatives authorized to perform the services required by this subpart.

(B) If, for any reason, the operator fails to properly care for, feed, or handle the quarantined ruminants as required in paragraph (d) of this section, or in accordance with animal health and husbandry standards provided elsewhere in this chapter, or fails to maintain and operate the facility as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, APHIS representatives are authorized to furnish such neglected services at the operator's expense, as authorized in paragraph (a) of this section.

(ii) Personnel. (A) The operator must provide adequate personnel to maintain the facility and care for the ruminants in quarantine, including attendants to care for and feed ruminants, and other personnel as needed to maintain, operate, and administer the facility.

(B) The operator must provide APHIS with an updated list of all personnel who have access to the facility. The list must include the names, current residential addresses, and identification numbers of each person, and must be updated with any changes or additions in advance of such person having access to the quarantine facility.

(C) The operator must provide APHIS with signed statements from all personnel having access to the facility in which the person agrees to comply with paragraph (d) of this section and applicable provisions of this part, all terms of the compliance agreement, and any related instructions from APHIS representatives pertaining to quarantine operations, including contact with animals both inside and outside the facility.

(iii) Authorized access. (A) Access to the facility premises as well as inside the quarantine area will be granted only to APHIS representatives and other persons specifically authorized to work at the facility. All other persons are prohibited from the premises unless specifically granted access by an APHIS representative. Any visitors granted access must be accompanied at all times by an APHIS representative while on the premises.

(B) All visitors, except veterinary practitioners who enter the facility to provide emergency care, must sign an affidavit before entering the quarantine area, if determined necessary by the overseeing APHIS representative, declaring that they will not have contact with any susceptible animals outside the facility for at least 5 days after contact with the ruminants in quarantine, or for a period of time determined by the overseeing APHIS representative as necessary to prevent the transmission of communicable livestock diseases of ruminants.

(iv) Sanitary practices. (A) All persons granted access to the quarantine area must:

(1) Wear clean protective work clothing and footwear upon entering the quarantine area.

(2) Wear disposable gloves when handling sick animals and then wash hands after removing gloves.

(3) Change protective clothing, footwear, and gloves when they become soiled or contaminated.

(4) Be prohibited, if determined necessary by the overseeing APHIS representative, from having contact with any susceptible animals outside the facility for at least 5 days after the last contact with ruminants in quarantine, or for a longer period of time determined necessary by the overseeing APHIS representative to prevent the transmission of livestock diseases.

(B) All equipment (including tractors) must be cleaned and disinfected prior to being used in the quarantine area of the facility with a disinfectant that is authorized in § 71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator. The equipment must remain dedicated to the facility for the entire quarantine period. Any equipment used with quarantined ruminants must remain dedicated to that particular lot of ruminants for the duration of the quarantine period or be cleaned and disinfected before coming in contact with ruminants from another lot. Prior to its use on another lot of ruminants or its removal from the quarantine area, such equipment must be cleaned and disinfected to the satisfaction of an APHIS representative.

(C) Any vehicle, before entering or leaving the quarantine area of the facility, must be immediately cleaned and disinfected under the oversight of an APHIS representative with a disinfectant that is authorized in § 71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator.

(D) If the facility has a single loading dock, the loading dock must be immediately cleaned and disinfected after each use under the oversight of an APHIS representative with a disinfectant that is authorized in § 71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator.

(E) That area of the facility in which a lot of ruminants had been held or had access must be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected under the oversight of an APHIS representative upon release of the ruminants, with a disinfectant that is authorized in § 71.10(a)(5) of this chapter or that is otherwise approved by the Administrator, before a new lot of ruminants is placed in that area of the facility.

(F) For medium security facilities only, the following additional sanitary practices also must be followed:

(1) All persons granted access to the quarantine area, must:

(i) Shower when leaving the quarantine area.

(ii) Shower before entering a lot-holding area if previously exposed from access to another lot-holding area.

(iii) Shower when leaving the necropsy area if a necropsy is in the process of being performed or has just been completed, or if all or portions of the examined animal remain exposed.

(iv) Be prohibited, unless specifically allowed otherwise by the overseeing APHIS representative, from having contact with any ruminants in the facility, other than the lot or lots of ruminants to which the person is assigned or is granted access.

(2) The operator is responsible for providing a sufficient supply of clothing and footwear to ensure that workers and others provided access to the quarantine area of the facility have clean, protective clothing and footwear before entering the facility.

(3) The operator is responsible for the proper handling, washing, and disposal of soiled and contaminated clothing worn in the quarantine area in a manner approved by an APHIS representative as adequate to preclude the transmission of disease within and from the facility. At the end of each workday, work clothing worn into each lot-holding area and elsewhere in the quarantine area must be collected and kept in bags until the clothing is washed. Used footwear must either be left in the clothes changing area or cleaned with hot water (148 °F minimum) and detergent and disinfected as directed by an APHIS representative.

(v) Handling of ruminants in quarantine. (A) Each lot of ruminants to be quarantined must be placed in the facility on an “all-in, all-out” basis. No ruminant may be taken out of a lot while the lot is in quarantine, except for diagnostic purposes, and no ruminant may be added to a lot while in quarantine.

(B) The facility must provide sufficient feed and bedding for the ruminants in quarantine, and it must be free of vermin and not spoiled. Feed and bedding must originate from a region that has been approved by APHIS as a source for feed and bedding.

(C) Breeding of ruminants or collection of germ plasm from ruminants is prohibited during the quarantine period unless necessary for a required import testing procedure.

(D) Ruminants in quarantine will be subjected to such tests and procedures as directed by an APHIS representative to determine whether the ruminants are free of communicable livestock diseases. While in quarantine, ruminants may be vaccinated only with vaccines that have been approved by the APHIS representative and licensed in accordance with § 102.5 of this chapter. 8 Vaccines must be administered either by an APHIS veterinarian or an accredited veterinarian under the direct oversight of an APHIS representative.

8 A list of approved vaccines is available from the Center for Veterinary Biologics, USDA, APHIS, VS, 510 south 17th Street6, Suite 104, Ames, IA 50010.

(E) Any death or suspected illness of ruminants in quarantine must be reported immediately to the overseeing APHIS representative. The affected ruminants must be disposed of as the Administrator may direct or, depending on the nature of the disease, must be cared for as directed by APHIS to prevent the spread of disease.

(F) Quarantined ruminants requiring specialized medical attention or additional postmortem testing may be transported off the quarantine site, if authorized by APHIS. A second quarantine site must be established to house the ruminants at the facility of destination (e.g., veterinary college hospital). In such cases, APHIS may extend the quarantine period until the results of any outstanding tests or postmortems are received.

(G) Should the Administrator determine that an animal health emergency exists at the facility, arrangements for the final disposition of the infected or exposed lot of ruminants must be accomplished within 4 workdays following disease confirmation. Subsequent disposition of the ruminants must occur under the direct oversight of APHIS representatives.

(vi) Recordkeeping. (A) The operator must maintain a current daily log, to record the entry and exit of all persons entering and leaving the facility.

(B) The operator must retain the daily log, along with any logs kept by APHIS and deposited with the operator, for at least 2 years following the date of release of the ruminants from quarantine and must make such logs available to APHIS representatives upon request.

(5) Environmental quality. If APHIS determines that a privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility does not meet applicable local, State, or Federal environmental regulations, APHIS may deny or suspend approval of the facility until appropriate remedial measures have been applied.

(6) Other laws. A privately owned medium or minimum security quarantine facility must comply with other applicable Federal laws and regulations, as well as with all applicable State and local codes and regulations.

(7) Variances. The Administrator may grant variances to existing requirements relating to location, construction, and other design features of a privately owned medium security quarantine facility or minimum security quarantine facility as well as to sanitation, security, operating procedures, recordkeeping, and other provisions in paragraph (d) of this section, but only if the Administrator determines that the variance causes no detrimental impact to the health of the ruminants or to the overall biological security of the quarantine operations. The operator must submit a request for a variance to the Administrator in writing at least 30 days in advance of the arrival of the ruminants to the facility. Any variance also must be expressly provided for in the compliance agreement.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0232) [55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 71 FR 29773, May 24, 2006; 86 FR 45624, Aug. 16, 2021; 88 FR 49998, Aug. 1, 2023]

§ 93.413 - Quarantine stations, visiting restricted; sales prohibited.

Visitors are not permitted in the quarantine enclosures during any time that ruminants are in quarantine unless the APHIS representative or inspector in charge specifically grants access under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed by the APHIS representative or inspector in charge. An importer (or his or her accredited agent or veterinarian) may be admitted to the yards and buildings containing his or her quarantined ruminants at such intervals as may be deemed necessary, and under such conditions and restrictions as may be imposed, by the APHIS representative or the inspector in charge of the quarantine facility or station. On the last day of the quarantine period, owners, officers, or registry societies, and others having official business or whose services may be necessary in the removal of the ruminants may be admitted upon written permission from the APHIS representative or inspector in charge. No exhibition or sale shall be allowed within the quarantine grounds.

[71 FR 29779, May 24, 2006]

§ 93.414 - Milk from quarantined ruminants.

Milk or cream from ruminants quarantined under the provisions of this part shall not be used by any person other than those in charge of such ruminants, nor be fed to any animals other than those within the same enclosure, without permission of the APHIS representative or inspector in charge of the quarantine station and subject to such restrictions as he or she may consider necessary to each instance. No milk or cream shall be removed from the quarantine premises except in compliance with all State and local regulations.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997, as amended at 71 FR 29779, May 24, 2006]

§ 93.415 - Manure from quarantined ruminants.

No manure shall be removed from the quarantine premises until the release of the ruminants producing same.

§ 93.416 - Appearance of disease among ruminants in quarantine.

If any contagious disease appears among ruminants during the quarantine period special precautions shall be taken to prevent spread of the infection to other animals in the quarantine station or to those outside the grounds. The affected ruminants shall be disposed of as the Administrator may direct, depending upon the nature of the disease.

CENTRAL AMERICA AND WEST INDIES 10

§ 93.422 - Import permit and declaration for ruminants.

(a) For ruminants intended for importation from regions of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in § 93.404: Provided, That the Administrator, when he or she finds that such action may be taken without endangering the livestock or poultry industry of the United States, may, upon request by any person, authorize the importation by such person, without such application or permit, from the British Virgin Islands into the Virgin Islands of the United States, of ruminants consigned for immediate slaughter, and such authorization may be limited to a particular shipment or extend to all shipments under this paragraph by such person during a specified period of time. The importation of cattle from any area infested with cattle fever ticks is prohibited except as provided in paragraph (c) of § 93.423.

(b) For all ruminants offered for importation from countries of Central America or of the West Indies, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in § 93.407.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997]

§ 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

(a) In addition to all other applicable requirements of the regulations in this part, ruminants intended for importation from Central America and the West Indies, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, must be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405(a) stating that the animals have been in that region at least 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment to the United States; that he or she has inspected the ruminants on the premises of origin and found them free from evidence of any communicable disease; and that, as far as it has been possible to determine, the ruminants have not been exposed to any communicable disease during the preceding 60 days. If no such veterinary officer is available in the region of origin, ruminants, other than sheep and goats, may be accompanied by an affidavit of the owner or importer stating that such ruminants have been in the region from which they were directly shipped to the United States for a period of at least 60 days immediately preceding the date of shipment therefrom, and that during such period no communicable disease has existed among them or among animals of their kind with which they have come in contact. Ruminants for which such affidavit is presented, unless imported for immediate slaughter, shall be quarantined at the port of entry at least seven days and during that time shall be subjected to such dipping, blood tests or other tests, as may be required by the Administrator to determine their freedom from communicable diseases. If imported for immediate slaughter, such animals shall be handled as provided in § 93.420.

(b) The certificate accompanying sheep and goats intended for importation from Central America and the West Indies must, in addition to the statements required by paragraph (a) of this section, meet all of the requirements of § 93.405.

(c) Cattle, which have been infested with or exposed to fever ticks, may be imported from the British Virgin Islands into the United States Virgin Islands, for immediate slaughter, only, if they are free from fever ticks at the time of such importation; if they are entered through one of the ports designated in § 93.403(d) and are consigned to a recognized slaughtering establishment with facilities approved by the Administrator for holding the animals in isolation until slaughtered, which shall be within 14 days after the date of entry into the United States Virgin Islands; and if they are accompanied by a certificate of a responsible official of the government of the British Virgin Islands certifying that the cattle originated in and are being shipped directly from the British Virgin Islands, that they are free of fever ticks, and that, as far as it has been possible to determine, such cattle are free from evidence of communicable disease and have not been exposed to any such disease common to animals of their kind, other than bovine babesiosis, during the 60 days preceding their movement to the United States Virgin Islands.

(d) If ruminants are unaccompanied by the certificate or affidavit as required by paragraphs (a), (b), or (c) of this section, or if they are found upon inspection at the port of entry to be affected with a communicable disease or to have been exposed thereto, they shall be refused entry, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. Ruminants refused entry shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(e) In addition to meeting all other applicable requirements of this part, bovines from Central America and the West Indies may be imported only in accordance with § 93.436.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0040) [55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 78 FR 72997, Dec. 4, 2013; 80 FR 10324, Feb. 26, 2015; 85 FR 57952, Sept. 17, 2020]
MEXICO 11

§ 93.424 - Import permits and applications for inspection of ruminants.

(a) For ruminants intended for importation from Mexico, the importer shall first apply for and obtain from APHIS an import permit as provided in § 93.404: Provided, that: An import permit is not required for sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter if the animal is offered for entry at a land border port designated in § 93.403(c).

(b) For ruminants intended for importation into the United States from Mexico the importer or his or her agent shall deliver to the veterinary inspector at the port of entry an application, in writing, for inspection, so that the veterinary inspector and customs representatives may make mutual satisfactory arrangements for the orderly inspection of the animals. The veterinary inspector at the port of entry will provide the importer or his or her agent with a written statement assigning a date when the animals may be presented for import inspection.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 60 FR 13898, 13900, Mar. 15, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 35534, June 16, 2003; 85 FR 57952, Sept. 17, 2020, 86 FR 68859, Dec. 3, 2021]

§ 93.425 - Declaration for ruminants.

For all ruminants offered for importation from Mexico, the importer or his or her agent shall present two copies of a declaration as provided in § 93.407.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997]

§ 93.426 - Inspection at port of entry.

(a) All ruminants offered for entry from Mexico, including such ruminants intended for movement through the United States in bond for immediate return to Mexico, shall be inspected at the port of entry, and all such ruminants found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation, and not to have been exposed thereto, shall be admitted into the United States subject to the other applicable provisions of this part. Ruminants found to be affected with or to have been exposed to a communicable disease, or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry except as provided in § 93.427(b)(2). Ruminants refused entry shall be handled or quarantined or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(b) Ruminants covered by paragraph (a) of this section shall be imported through ports, designated in § 93.403, which are equipped with facilities necessary for proper chute inspection, dipping, and testing, as provided in this part.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 60 FR 13898, Mar. 15, 1995. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003]

§ 93.427 - Cattle and other bovines from Mexico.

Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 5, Jan. 2, 2009. Link to a correction published at 74 FR 22091, May 12, 2009.

(a) Cattle and other ruminants from Mexico. Cattle and other ruminants from Mexico, except animals being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico or animals imported for immediate slaughter, may be detained at the port of entry, and there subjected to such disinfection, blood tests, other tests, and dipping as required in this part to determine their freedom from any communicable disease or infection of such disease. The importer shall be responsible for the care, feed, and handling of the animals during the period of detention. In addition, each steer or spayed heifer imported into the United States from Mexico shall be identified with a distinct, permanent, and legible “M” mark applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method prior to arrival at a port of entry, unless the steer or spayed heifer is being transported in bond for immediate return to Mexico or imported for slaughter in accordance with § 93.429. The “M” mark shall be between 3 inches (7.5 cm) and 5 inches (12.5 cm) high and wide, and shall be applied to each animal's right hip, within 4 inches (10 cm) of the midline of the tailhead (that is, the top of the brand should be within 4 inches (10 cm) of the midline of the tailhead, and placed above the hook and pin bones). The brand should also be within 18 inches (45.7 cm) of the anus.

(b)(1) Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has determined to be free from fever ticks. APHIS has evaluated certain regions of Mexico in accordance with § 92.2 of this chapter, and determined that they are free from fever ticks; a list of all such regions is found on the internet at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/disease-status-of-regions. Copies of the list can be obtained via postal mail or email upon request to Regionalization Evaluation Services, Strategy and Policy, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road, Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737; AskRegionalization@usda.gov. Regions may be removed from the list based on a determination by APHIS that fever ticks exist in the region, on the discovery of tick-infested cattle from the region at a port of entry into the United States, or on information provided by a representative of the government of that region that fever ticks exist in the region. Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has determined to be free from fever ticks may be imported into the United States subject to the following conditions:

(i) The cattle are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405 that states that the cattle originate from a region of Mexico that APHIS has determined to be free from fever ticks.

(ii) If the cattle will transit to the United States through an area of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks, they are moved in a sealed means of conveyance, and that seal remains intact throughout such transit.

(iii) The cattle are presented for entry into the United States at a land border port of entry listed in § 93.403(c).

(iv) The cattle are segregated at the U.S. port of entry from cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks.

(v) The importer, or his or her agent, executes and delivers to the inspector at the port of entry an application for inspection or supervised dipping. In this application, the importer, or his or her agent, waive all claims against the United States for any loss or damage to the cattle occasioned by or resulting from inspection or dipping or from the fact that the cattle are later found still to be tick infested, and for any loss or damage to any other cattle in the importer's possession or control that come in contact with the dipped cattle.

(vi) The cattle are either inspected by an APHIS inspector at the port of entry for evidence of tick infestation or are treated with a tickicidal dip that is listed in § 72.13 of this chapter under the supervision of an inspector at the port of entry.

(vii) If any cattle are determined to be infested with fever ticks, the lot of cattle is refused entry and may only be imported into the United States subject to the requirements in paragraph (b)(2) of this section.

(2) Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks. Cattle from regions of Mexico that APHIS has not determined to be free from fever ticks may only be imported into the United States subject to the following conditions:

(i) The cattle have been inspected by a veterinarian in Mexico and, in the determination of the veterinarian, are free from fever ticks and all evidence of communicable diseases, and have not been exposed to communicable diseases, other than bovine babesiosis, during the 60 days prior to movement to a port of entry into the United States.

(ii) The cattle have been treated in Mexico with a tickicidal dip that is listed in § 72.13 of this chapter within 7 to 14 days before being offered for entry into the United States.

(iii) The cattle are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405 that states that this inspection and dipping have occurred.

(iv) The cattle are presented for entry into the United States at the port of entry at Santa Teresa, NM, or a port of entry within Texas that is listed in § 93.403(c).

(v) The importer, or his or her agent, executes and delivers to the inspector at the port of entry an application for inspection and supervised dipping. In this application, the importer, or his or her agent, agrees to waive all claims against the United States for any loss or damage to the cattle occasioned by or resulting from this dipping or from the fact that the cattle are later found to still be infested with ticks, and for any loss or damage to any other cattle in the importer's possession or control that come in contact with the dipped cattle.

(vi) When offered for entry, the cattle receive an inspection by an inspector. If free from fever ticks, the cattle are treated once with a tickicidal dip that is listed in § 72.13 of this chapter 7 to 14 days after the dipping required in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this section. If found to be infested with fever ticks, the cattle are refused entry and may not be inspected again at a port of entry until they are again dipped and 7 to 14 days have elapsed.

(vii) The cattle are not imported into an area of Texas that is quarantined in accordance with § 72.5 of this chapter for bovine babesiosis, or for tick infestation.

(c) Importation of Holsteins from Mexico. The importation of Holstein steers, Holstein spayed heifers, Holstein cross steers, and Holstein cross spayed heifers from Mexico is prohibited.

(d) [Reserved]

(e) BSE. In addition to meeting the requirements of this section and all other applicable requirements of this part, bovines may be imported from Mexico only under the following conditions:

(1) The bovines were born after November 30, 2007, the date determined by APHIS to be the date of effective enforcement of a ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in Mexico.

(2) The bovines were officially identified prior to arriving at the port of entry in the United States with unique individual identification that is traceable to each bovine's premises of origin. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter.

(3) The bovines, if sexually intact, are permanently and humanely identified using one of the following additional methods:

(i) An “M” mark properly applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method, and easily visible on the live animal and on the carcass before skinning. Such a mark must be between 3 inches (7.5 cm) and 5 inches (12.5 cm) high and wide, and must be applied to the upper right front shoulder of each animal; or

(ii) A tattoo with the letters “MX” applied to the inside of one ear of the animal; or

(iii) Other means of permanent identification upon request if deemed adequate by the Administrator to humanely identify the animal in a distinct and legible way as having been imported from Mexico.

(4) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405 that states, in addition to the statements required by § 93.405, that the conditions of paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(3) of this section have been met.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0224, 0579-0393, and 0579-0425) [55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990. Redesignated at 62 FR 56012, Oct. 28, 1997] Editorial Note:For Federal Register citations affecting § 93.427, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov. Effective Date Note:At 74 FR 5, Jan. 2, 2009, as corrected at 74 FR 22091, May 12, 2009, § 93.427 was amended by revising paragraph (b)(2) introductory text, effective date delayed indefinitely. For the convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 93.427 Cattle from Mexico.

(b) * * *

(2) Cattle that have been exposed to splenetic, southern, or tick fever, or that have been infested with or exposed to fever ticks, may be imported from Mexico for admission into the United States, except into areas of Texas quarantined because of said disease or tick infestation as specified in § 72.5 of this chapter, at one of the land border ports in Texas listed in § 93.403(c), the port of Santa Teresa, NM, or the port of San Luis, AZ, provided that the following conditions are strictly observed and complied with:

§ 93.428 - Sheep and goats and wild ruminants from Mexico.

(a) Sheep, goats, and native wild ruminants intended for import from Mexico must be imported in accordance with § 93.435, and shall be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405 and stating, if such sheep and goats are shipped by rail or truck, that such animals were loaded into cleaned and disinfected cars or trucks for transportation direct to the port of entry. Notwithstanding such certificate, such sheep and goats shall be detained as provided in § 93.427(a) and shall be dipped at least once in a permitted scabies dip under supervision of an inspector.

(b) The certificate accompanying goats offered for importation from Mexico shall, in addition to the statements required by paragraph (a) of this section, state that such goats have been tested for tuberculosis and brucellosis with negative results within 30 days preceding their being offered for entry, and give the date and method of testing, the name of the consignor and of the consignee, and a description of the animals including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and eartag numbers. Notwithstanding such certification, such goats shall be detained or quarantined as provided in § 93.427 and retested for brucellosis.

(c) If sheep or goats are unaccompanied by the certificate as required by paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, or if they are found upon inspection or retesting, as provided for in this part, to be affected with a communicable disease or to have been exposed thereto, they shall be refused entry and shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(d) Certificates will not be required for wild ruminants, other than sheep and goats, originating in and shipped direct from Mexico, but such animals are subject to inspection at the port of entry as provided in § 93.426.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040 and 0579-0453) [55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 56 FR 367, Jan. 4, 1991; 57 FR 28081, June 24, 1992; 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997; 68 FR 6344, Feb. 7, 2003; 86 FR 68859, Dec. 3, 2021]

§ 93.429 - Ruminants for immediate slaughter.

Ruminants, other than sheep and goats, may be imported from Mexico, subject to the applicable provisions of §§ 93.424, 93.425, 93.426, and 93.427(b)(2) for immediate slaughter if accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405(a) and stating that the veterinarian who issued the certificate has inspected the animals in the herd from which the ruminants will be imported and found them free of evidence of communicable disease, and that, so far as it has been possible to determine, they have not been exposed to any such disease common to animals of their kind during the preceding 60 days, and if the ruminants are shipped by rail or truck, the certificate shall further specify that the ruminants were loaded into cleaned and disinfected cars or trucks for transportation directly to the port of entry. Such ruminants shall be moved from the port of entry in conveyances sealed with seals of the United States Government. Sheep and goats from any part of Mexico may be imported only in compliance with other applicable sections in this part.

[55 FR 31495, Aug. 2, 1990, as amended at 57 FR 28081, June 24, 1992; 61 FR 17239, Apr. 19, 1996. Redesignated and amended at 62 FR 56012, 56019, Oct. 28, 1997]
ADDITIONAL GENERAL PROVISIONS

§§ 93.430-93.434 - §[Reserved]

§ 93.435 - Sheep and goats.

(a) General provisions. (1) Sheep and goats imported from anywhere in the world shall be accompanied by a certificate issued in accordance with § 93.405. If the sheep or goats are not accompanied by the certificate, or if they are found upon inspection at the port of entry to be affected with or exposed to a communicable disease, they shall be refused entry and shall be handled or quarantined, or otherwise disposed of, as the Administrator may direct.

(2) All imported sheep and goats must be officially identified at the time of presentation for entry into the United States with official identification devices or methods and which will allow the animals not imported for immediate slaughter or for feeding for slaughter to be traced at any time to the farm or premises of birth, and for animals imported for immediate slaughter or for feeding for slaughter to the flock of residence. Official identification devices may not be removed or altered at any time after entry into the United States, except by an authorized USDA representative at the time of slaughter. A list of the acceptable types of official identification devices or methods may be found on the APHIS website at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-and-animal-product-import-information/imports/live-animal-imports.

(3) All imported sheep and goats other than for immediate slaughter or as provided in paragraph (c) of this section for restricted feeding for slaughter must be identified at the time of presentation for entry into the United States with a country mark using a means and in a location on the animal approved by the Administrator for this use. A list of the acceptable country marks may be found on the APHIS website at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-and-animal-product-import-information/imports/live-animal-imports.

(4) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section for sheep or goats imported for immediate slaughter, and in paragraph (c) of this section for sheep or goats for restricted feeding for slaughter, the importer shall maintain records of the sale, death or other disposition of all imported animals including the official identification number(s) and country marks on the animals at the time of import; a record of the replacement of any lost identification devices linking the new official identification number to the lost device number; the date and manner of disposition; and the name and address of the new owner. Such records must be maintained for a period of 5 years after the sale or death of the animal. The records must be available for APHIS to view and copy during normal business hours.

(b) Sheep and goats imported for immediate slaughter from anywhere in the world. (1) Sheep and goats for immediate slaughter may only be imported into the United States from countries or regions determined to be free of classical scrapie by APHIS, or that have scrapie awareness, surveillance, and control programs evaluated and determined by APHIS to be effective.

(2) Sheep and goats imported for immediate slaughter must be imported only through a port of entry listed in § 93.403(b) or as provided for in § 93.403(f) and be inspected at the port of entry and otherwise handled in accordance with § 93.408.

(3) The ruminants must be moved directly from the port of entry to a recognized slaughtering establishment in conveyances that are sealed with seals of the U.S. Government at the port of entry. The seals may be broken only at the recognized slaughtering establishment by an authorized USDA representative.

(4) The shipment must be accompanied from the port of entry to the recognized slaughtering establishment by APHIS Form VS 17-33.

(c) Sheep and goats imported for restricted feeding for slaughter. (1) Sheep and goats for restricted feeding for slaughter purposes may only be imported into the United States from countries or regions determined to be free of classical scrapie by APHIS, or that have scrapie awareness, surveillance, and control programs evaluated and determined by APHIS to be effective.

(2) The sheep and goats must be imported only through a port of entry allowed in § 93.403 in a means of conveyance sealed in the region of origin with seals of the national government of the region of origin. The seals may be broken either by an APHIS representative at the port of entry, or at the designated feedlot by an authorized APHIS representative. If the seals are broken by an APHIS representative, the means of conveyance must be resealed with seals of the U.S. Government before being moved to the designated feedlot; and

(3) The sheep and goats shall be inspected by the port veterinarian or other designated representative at the port of entry to determine that the animals are free from evidence of communicable disease and are considered fit for further travel; and

(4) The sheep and goats must be moved directly as a group from the port of entry to a designated feedlot; and

(5) The sheep and goats may not be commingled with any sheep or goats that are not being moved directly to slaughter from the designated feedlot; and

(6) The sheep and goats may be moved from the port of entry only to a feedlot designated in accordance with paragraph (c)(11) of this section and must be accompanied from the port of entry to the designated feedlot by APHIS Form VS 17-130 or other movement documentation stipulated in the import permit; and

(7) Upon arrival at the designated feedlot, the official identification for each animal must be reconciled by an APHIS veterinarian, or other official designated by APHIS, with the accompanying documentation; and

(8) The sheep and goats must remain at the designated feedlot until transported to a recognized slaughtering establishment. The sheep and goats must be moved directly to the recognized slaughtering establishment in a means of conveyance sealed by an accredited veterinarian, a State representative, or an APHIS representative with seals of the U.S. Government. The seals must be broken at the recognized slaughtering establishment only by an authorized USDA representative; and

(9) The sheep and goats must be accompanied to the recognized slaughtering establishments by APHIS Form VS 1-27 or other documentation stipulated in the import permits; and

(10) The sheep and goats must be slaughtered within 12 months of importation.

(11) To be eligible as a designated feedlot to receive sheep and goats imported for feeding, a feedlot must be approved by APHIS. To be approved by APHIS, the feedlot operator or his or her agent must enter into a compliance agreement with the Administrator. The compliance agreement must provide that the operator:

(i) Will monitor all imported feeder animals to ensure that they have the required official identification at the time of arrival to the feedlot; and will not remove official identification from animals unless medically necessary, in which case new official identification will be applied and cross referenced in the records. Any lost official identification will be replaced with eartags provided by APHIS for purposes of this paragraph (c)(11)(i) and will be linked as the new official identification with the lost identification. If more than one animal loses their official identification at the same time, the new official identification will be linked with all possible original identification numbers;

(ii) Will monitor all incoming imported feeder animals to ensure they have the required country mark, or will maintain all imported animals in separate pens from U.S. origin animals, and all sheep and goats that enter the feedlot are moved only for slaughter;

(iii) Will maintain records of the acquisition and disposition of all imported sheep and goats entering the feedlot, including the official identification number and all other identifying information, the age of each animal, the date each animal was acquired and the date each animal was shipped to slaughter, and the name and location of the plant where each animal was slaughtered. For imported animals that die in the feedlot, the feedlot will remove the official identification device if affixed to the animal, or will record any other official identification on the animal and place the official identification device or record of official identification in a file with a record of the disposition of the carcass;

(iv) Will maintain copies of the APHIS Forms VS 17-130 and VS 1-27 or other movement documentation deemed acceptable by the Administrator that have been issued for incoming animals and for animals moved to slaughter and that list the official identification of each animal;

(v) Will allow State and Federal animal health officials access to inspect its premises and animals and to review inventory records and other required files upon request;

(vi) Will keep required records for at least 5 years;

(vii) Will designate either the entire feedlot or pens within the feedlot as terminal for sheep and goats to be moved only directly to slaughter;

(viii) Will prevent fence-line contact with sheep or goats outside the designated feedlot;

(ix) Agrees that if inventory cannot be reconciled or if animals are not moved to slaughter as required, the approval of the feedlot to receive additional animals will be immediately withdrawn and any imported animals remaining in the feedlot will be disposed of as directed by the Administrator;

(x) Agrees that if an imported animal gives birth in the feedlot, the offspring will be humanely euthanized and the birth tissues and soiled bedding disposed of in a sanitary landfill or by another means approved by the Administrator; and

(xi) Agrees to maintain sexually intact animals of different genders over 5 months of age in separate enclosures.

(xii) For a feedlot to be approved to receive sheep or goats imported for feeding under this section, but which do not have a country mark, the compliance agreement must also provide that the feedlot will maintain all imported animals in separate pens from U.S. origin animals and that all sheep and goats that enter the feedlot are moved only for slaughter.

(d) Other importations. Sheep or goats imported other than as provided in paragraph (b) of this section for immediate slaughter or as provided in paragraph (c) of this section for sheep and goats imported for restricted feeding for slaughter must originate from a region recognized as free of classical scrapie by APHIS or from a flock that has certified status or equivalent status in a scrapie flock certification program or equivalent program approved by APHIS, or as provided in § 93.404(a)(5) or (6).

(e) Sheep and goats transiting the United States. Sheep or goats that meet the entry requirements for immediate slaughter in § 93.405 may transit the United States in accordance with § 93.401 regardless of their intended use in the receiving country.

(f) Classical scrapie status of foreign regions. APHIS considers classical scrapie to exist in all regions of the world except those declared free of this disease by APHIS.

(1) A list of regions that APHIS has declared free of classical scrapie is maintained on the APHIS website at https://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/animal_disease_status.shtml. Copies of the list are also available via postal mail, fax, or email upon request to Regionalization Evaluation Services, Strategy and Policy, Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road Unit 38, Riverdale, Maryland 20737.

(2) APHIS will add a region to the list in paragraph (f)(1) only after conducting an evaluation of the region in accordance with § 92.2 of this subchapter and finding classical scrapie is not likely to be present in its sheep or goat populations. In the case of a formerly listed region removed due to an outbreak, the region may be returned to the list in accordance with the procedures for reestablishment of a region's disease-free status in § 92.4 of this subchapter. APHIS will remove a region from the list of those it has declared free of classical scrapie upon determining classical scrapie exists there based on reports APHIS receives of outbreaks of the disease in sheep or goats from veterinary officials of the exporting country, from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), from other sources the Administrator determines to be reliable, or upon determining that the region's animal health infrastructure, regulations, or policy no longer qualifies the region for such status.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control numbers 0579-0040, 0579-0101, and 0579-0453) [86 FR 68859, Dec. 3, 2021]

§ 93.436 - Bovines from regions of negligible risk, controlled risk, and undetermined risk for BSE.

The importation of bovines is prohibited, unless the conditions of this section and any other applicable conditions of this part are met. Once the bovines are imported, if they do not meet the conditions of this section, they must be disposed of as the Administrator may direct.

(a) Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE in which there has been no indigenous case of BSE. Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE, as defined in § 92.1 of this subchapter, in which there has been no indigenous case of BSE, may be imported only if the bovines are accompanied by an original certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, or issued by a veterinarian designated or accredited by the national government of the exporting region and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, and the certificate attests that the exporting region of the bovines is classified by APHIS as a negligible-risk region for BSE in which there has been no indigenous case of BSE.

(b) Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE in which there has been an indigenous case of BSE and bovines from a region of controlled risk for BSE. Bovines from a region of negligible risk for BSE, as defined in § 92.1 of this subchapter, in which there has been an indigenous case of BSE, and bovines from a region of controlled risk for BSE, as defined in § 92.1 of this subchapter, may be imported only under the following conditions:

(1) Prior to importation into the United States, each bovine is officially identified with unique individual identification that is traceable to the premises of origin of the animal. No person may alter, deface, remove, or otherwise tamper with the official identification while the animal is in the United States or moving into or through the United States, except that the identification may be removed at slaughter.

(2) The bovines are permanently and humanely identified before arrival at the port of entry with a distinct and legible mark identifying the exporting country. Acceptable means of permanent identification include the following:

(i) A mark properly applied with a freeze brand, hot iron, or other method, and easily visible on the live animal and on the carcass before skinning. Such a mark must be not less than 2 inches nor more than 3 inches high, and must be applied to each animal's right hip, high on the tail-head (over the junction of the sacral and first coccygeal vertebrae);

(ii) A tattoo with letters identifying the exporting country must be applied to the inside of one ear of the animal; or

(iii) Other means of permanent identification upon request if deemed adequate by the Administrator to humanely identify the animal in a distinct and legible way as having been imported from a region of negligible risk for BSE in which there has been an indigenous case of BSE or from a region of controlled risk for BSE.

(3) The bovines were born after the date from which the ban on the feeding of ruminants meat-and-bone meal or greaves derived from ruminants has been effectively enforced.

(4) The bovines are accompanied by an original certificate issued by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, or issued by a veterinarian designated or accredited by the national government of the exporting region and endorsed by a full-time salaried veterinary officer of the national government of the exporting region, representing that the veterinarian issuing the certificate was authorized to do so, and the certificate attests to the BSE risk classification of the exporting region and that the conditions of paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(3) of this section have been met.

(5) If there has been an indigenous case of BSE in the exporting region, the following restrictions apply:

(i) Bovines that, during their first year of life, were reared with a bovine determined to be infected with BSE during its first year of life, and that an investigation showed consumed the same potentially contaminated feed as the infected animal during that period are not eligible for importation into the United States; and

(ii) If the investigation was unable to determine whether the feed source that was used to feed the bovine known to be infected was also used to feed other bovines in the herd of the infected animal, all bovines born in the same herd as a BSE-infected bovine either within 12 months before or 12 months after the birth of the infected animal are not eligible for importation into the United States.

(c) Bovines from a region of undetermined risk for BSE. Importation of bovines from a region of undetermined risk for BSE, as defined in § 92.1 of this subchapter, is prohibited; Except that: The Administrator may allow such imports on a case-by-case basis if the live bovines are imported for specific uses, including, but not limited to, show or exhibition, and under conditions determined by the Administrator to be adequate to prevent the spread of BSE.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0234) [78 FR 72997, Dec. 4, 2013]

§ 93.437 - Tuberculosis status of foreign regions.

(a) Level I regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for tuberculosis classification in accordance with § 93.438, and a prevalence of tuberculosis in their domestic bovine herds of less than 0.001 percent over at least the previous 2 years (24 consecutive months).

(b) Level II regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for tuberculosis classification in accordance with § 93.438, and a prevalence of tuberculosis in their domestic bovine herds equal to or greater than 0.001 percent, but less than 0.01 percent, over the previous 2 years (24 consecutive months).

(c) Level III regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for tuberculosis classification in accordance with § 93.438, and a prevalence of tuberculosis in their domestic bovine herds equal to or greater than 0.01 percent, but less than 0.1 percent, over the previous year (12 consecutive months).

(d) Level IV regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for tuberculosis classification in accordance with § 93.438, and a prevalence of tuberculosis in their domestic bovine herds equal to or greater than 0.1 percent, but less than 0.5 percent, over the previous year (12 consecutive months).

(e) Level V regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world not to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for tuberculosis classification in accordance with § 93.438, to have a prevalence of tuberculosis in their domestic bovine herds equal to or greater than 0.5 percent, or to be unassessed by APHIS with regard to tuberculosis.

(f) Listing of regions. Lists of all Level I regions, Level II regions, Level III regions, Level IV regions, and Level V regions for tuberculosis are found online, at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/live_animals.shtml. Changes to the lists will be made in accordance with § 93.438.

[85 FR 57953, Sept. 17, 2020]

§ 93.438 - Process for requesting regional classification for tuberculosis.

(a) Request for regional classification; requirements. A representative of the national government(s) of any country or countries who has the authority to make such a request may request that APHIS classify a region for tuberculosis. Requests for classification or reclassification must be submitted to APHIS electronically or through the mail as provided at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/live_animals.shtml. Guidance regarding how to complete a request in a manner that will allow APHIS to review it expeditiously is available at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/reg_request.shtml, and may also be obtained by contacting the National Director, Regionalization Evaluation Services, Strategy and Policy Unit, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road, Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737. At a minimum, in order for APHIS to consider the request complete, it must define the boundaries of the region, specify the prevalence level for tuberculosis within the region, and demonstrate the following:

(1) That there is effective veterinary control and oversight within the region;

(2) That tuberculosis is a notifiable disease within the region; and

(3) That the region has a program in place for tuberculosis that includes, at a minimum:

(i) Epidemiological investigations following the discovery of any infected animals or affected herds, or any animals or herds that have had non-negative test results following a test for tuberculosis, and documentation of these investigations;

(ii) Management of affected herds in a manner designed to eradicate tuberculosis from those herds in a timely manner, and documentation regarding this management;

(iii) Regulatory controls on the movement of livestock into, within, and from the region that correspond to the risk of dissemination of tuberculosis associated with such movement; and

(iv) Access to, oversight of, and quality controls for diagnostic testing for tuberculosis within the region.

(4) That the region has surveillance in place that is equivalent to or exceeds Federal standards for surveillance within the United States.

(b) APHIS evaluation. If, after reviewing and evaluating the request for classification, APHIS believes the region can be accurately classified for tuberculosis, APHIS will publish a notice in the Federal Register proposing to classify the region according to § 93.437, and making the information upon which this proposed classification is based available to the public for review and comment. The notice will request public comment.

(c) APHIS determination. (1) If no comments are received on the notice, or if comments are received but do not affect APHIS' proposed classification, APHIS will publish a subsequent notice in the Federal Register announcing that classification to be final and adding the region to the appropriate list on the APHIS website.

(2) If comments received on the notice suggest that the region be classified according to a different tuberculosis classification, and APHIS agrees with the comments, APHIS will publish a subsequent notice in the Federal Register making the information supplied by commenters available to the public, and proposing to classify the region according to this different classification. The notice will request public comment.

(3) If comments received on the notice suggest that insufficient information was supplied on which to base a tuberculosis classification, and APHIS agrees with the comments, APHIS will publish a subsequent notice in the Federal Register specifying the additional information needed before APHIS can classify the region.

(d) Maintaining classification and reclassification initiated by APHIS. If a region is classified under the provisions of this section, that region may be required to submit additional information or allow APHIS to conduct additional information collection activities in order for that region to maintain its classification. Moreover, if APHIS determines that a region's classification for tuberculosis is no longer accurate, APHIS will publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing the revised classification and setting forth the reasons for this reclassification.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0442) [85 FR 57953, Sept. 17, 2020]

§ 93.439 - Importation of ruminants from certain regions of the world; tuberculosis.

(a) Importation of certain ruminants prohibited. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section, ruminants that are known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis and ruminants that have had a non-negative response to any test for tuberculosis at any time are prohibited importation into the United States.

(b) Identification of bovines imported for any purpose. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator, bovines imported into the United States for any purpose must be officially identified and accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), that lists the official identification of the animals presented for import.

(c) Importation of bovines from a Level I region. Unless specified otherwise by the Administrator, bovines may be imported into the United States from a Level I region for tuberculosis in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section. 12

12 The importation of such bovines, as well as that of all other bovines covered by this section, is still subject to all other relevant restrictions of this part.

(d) Importation of bovines from a Level II region. (1) Sexually intact bovines may be imported into the United States from a Level II region for tuberculosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter provided that the bovines are subjected to an individual test for tuberculosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results.

(2) Steers or spayed heifers may be imported into the United States from a Level II region for tuberculosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section.

(e) Importation of bovines from a Level III region. (1) Bovines directly from currently accredited herds for tuberculosis. Bovines may be imported into the United States for purposes other than immediate slaughter directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis in a Level III region for tuberculosis, provided that:

(i) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines originate directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis; and

(ii) If sexually intact, the bovines are subjected to an individual test for tuberculosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results.

(2) Sexually intact bovines that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis may be imported into the United States from a Level III region for tuberculosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter, provided that:

(i) The bovines originate from a herd that was subjected to a whole herd test for tuberculosis on its premises of origin no more than 1 year prior to the export of the bovines to the United States, with negative results; and

(ii) The bovines are subjected to an individual test for tuberculosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results; and

(iii) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the animals meet the conditions for importation in paragraph (e)(2)(i) of this section.

(3) Steers or spayed heifers that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis may be imported into the United States from a Level III region for tuberculosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter provided that:

(i) The steers or spayed heifers are subjected to an individual test for tuberculosis no more than 60 days prior to export of the bovines to the United States, with negative results; and

(ii) The steers or spayed heifers are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the animals meet the conditions for importation in paragraph (e)(3)(i) of this section.

(f) Importation of bovines from a Level IV region. (1) Bovines may be imported into the United States for purposes other than immediate slaughter directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis in a Level IV region for tuberculosis, provided that:

(i) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines originate directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis and, if steers or spayed heifers, meet the conditions for importation in paragraph (f)(1)(iii) of this section; and

(ii) If sexually intact, the bovines are subjected to an individual test for tuberculosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results; and

(iii) If steers and spayed heifers, the bovines are subjected to an individual test for tuberculosis no more than 60 days prior to export of the bovines to the United States, with negative results.

(2) Sexually intact bovines that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis may be imported into the United States from a Level IV region for tuberculosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter, provided that:

(i) The bovines originate from a herd that was subjected to two whole herd tests for tuberculosis on its premises of origin and conducted no less than 9 months and no more than 15 months apart, with the second whole herd test conducted no less than 60 days and no more than 12 months prior the export of the bovines to the United States, with negative results each time; and

(ii) The bovines are subjected to an additional individual test for tuberculosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results; and

(iii) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines meet the requirements in paragraph (f)(2)(i) of this section.

(3) Steers or spayed heifers that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for tuberculosis may be imported into the United States from a Level IV region for tuberculosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter provided that:

(i) The bovines originate from a herd that was subjected to a whole herd test for tuberculosis on its premises of origin no more than 1 year prior to the export of the bovines, with negative results; and

(ii) The bovines are subjected to an additional individual test for tuberculosis no more than 60 days prior to export of the bovines to the United States, with negative results, except that the individual test is not required if the bovines are exported within 60 days of the whole herd test and were included in that test; and

(iii) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines meet the requirements in this paragraph (f)(3).

(g) Importation of bovines from a Level V region. At the discretion of the Administrator, bovines may be imported into the United States from a Level V region for tuberculosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter, provided that:

(1) The bovines are subject to a pre-clearance program administered by APHIS and detailed in an import protocol published on the APHIS website; and

(2) The bovines are subjected to an additional individual test for tuberculosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results; and

(3) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that bovines meet the requirements in paragraphs (g)(1) and (2) of this section.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0442) [85 FR 57954, Sept. 17, 2020]

§ 93.440 - Brucellosis status of foreign regions.

(a) Level I regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for brucellosis classification in accordance with § 93.441, and a prevalence of brucellosis in their domestic bovine herds of less than 0.001 percent over at least the previous 2 years (24 consecutive months).

(b) Level II regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for brucellosis classification in accordance with § 93.441, and a prevalence of brucellosis in their domestic bovine herds equal to or greater than 0.001 percent, but less than 0.01 percent over at least the previous 2 years (24 consecutive months).

(c) Level III regions. APHIS considers certain regions of the world not to have a program that meets APHIS requirements for brucellosis classification in accordance with § 93.441, to have a herd prevalence equal to or greater than 0.01 percent, or to be unassessed by APHIS with regard to brucellosis prevalence.

(d) Listing of regions. Lists of all Level I, Level II, and Level III regions for brucellosis are found online, at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/live_animals.shtml. Changes to the lists will be made in accordance with § 93.441.

[85 FR 57955, Sept. 17, 2020]

§ 93.441 - Process for requesting regional classification for brucellosis.

(a) Request for regional classification; requirements. A representative of the national government(s) of any country or countries who has the authority to make such a request may request that APHIS classify a region for brucellosis. Requests for classification or reclassification must be submitted to APHIS electronically or through the mail as provided at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/live_animals.shtml. Guidance regarding how to complete a request in a manner that will allow APHIS to review it expeditiously is available at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/animals/reg_request.shtml, and may also be obtained by contacting the National Director, Regionalization Evaluation Services, Strategy and Policy Unit, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road, Unit 38, Riverdale, MD 20737. At a minimum, in order for APHIS to consider the request complete, it must define the boundaries of the region, specify the prevalence level for brucellosis within the region, and demonstrate the following:

(1) That there is effective veterinary control and oversight within the region;

(2) That brucellosis is a notifiable disease within the region;

(3) That the region has a program for brucellosis in place that includes, at a minimum:

(i) Epidemiological investigations following the discovery of any infected animals or affected herds, or any animals or herds that have had non-negative test results following a test for brucellosis, and documentation of these investigations;

(ii) Management of affected herds in a manner designed to eradicate brucellosis from those herds, and documentation regarding this management;

(iii) Regulatory controls on the movement of livestock into, within, and from the region that correspond to the risk of dissemination of brucellosis associated with such movement; and

(iv) Access to, oversight of, and quality controls on diagnostic testing for brucellosis within the region;

(4) That the region has surveillance in place that is equivalent to or exceeds Federal standards for brucellosis surveillance within the United States; and

(5) That, if the region vaccinates for brucellosis, it is in a manner that has been approved by APHIS.

(b) APHIS evaluation. If, after reviewing and evaluating the request for classification, APHIS believes the region can be accurately classified for brucellosis, APHIS will publish a notice in the Federal Register proposing to classify the region according to § 93.440, and making available to the public the information upon which this proposed classification is based. The notice will request public comment.

(c) APHIS determination. (1) If no comments are received on the notice, or if comments are received but do not affect APHIS' proposed classification, APHIS will publish a subsequent notice in the Federal Register announcing that classification to be final and adding the region to the appropriate list on the internet.

(2) If comments received on the notice suggest that the region be classified according to a different brucellosis classification, and APHIS agrees with the comments, APHIS will publish a subsequent notice in the Federal Register making the information supplied by commenters available to the public, and proposing to classify the region according to this different classification. The notice will request public comment.

(3) If comments received on the notice suggest that insufficient information was supplied on which to base a brucellosis classification, and APHIS agrees with the comments, APHIS will publish a subsequent notice in the Federal Register specifying the additional information needed before APHIS can classify the region.

(d) Maintaining classification and reclassification initiated by APHIS. If a region is classified under the provisions of this section, that region may be required to submit additional information or allow APHIS to conduct additional information collection activities in order for that region to maintain its classification. Moreover, if APHIS determines that a region's classification for brucellosis is no longer accurate, APHIS will publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing the revised classification and setting forth the reasons for this reclassification.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0442) [85 FR 57955, Sept. 17, 2020]

§ 93.442 - Importation of ruminants from certain regions of the world; brucellosis.

(a) Importation of certain ruminants prohibited. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section, ruminants that are known to be infected with or exposed to brucellosis are prohibited importation into the United States.

(b) Identification of bovines imported for any purpose. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator, bovines imported into the United States for any purpose must be officially identified and accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), that lists the official identification of the animals presented for import.

(c) Importation of steers and spayed heifers. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator, steers and spayed heifers may be imported into the United States from a region in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section, without further restrictions under this part.

(d) Importation of sexually intact bovines from Level I regions. Unless specified otherwise by the Administrator, sexually intact bovines may be imported into the United States from a Level I region for brucellosis in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section. 13

13 The importation of such bovines, as well as that of all other bovines covered by this section, is still subject to all other relevant restrictions of this chapter.

(e) Importation of sexually intact bovines from a Level II region. (1) Sexually intact bovines directly from currently accredited herds for brucellosis. Sexually intact bovines may be imported into the United States for purposes other than immediate slaughter from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis in a Level II region for brucellosis, provided that the bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines originate directly from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis.

(2) Sexually intact bovines that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis. Sexually intact bovines that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis may be imported into the United States from a Level II region for brucellosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter, provided that:

(i) The bovines originate from a herd that was subjected to a whole herd test for brucellosis on its premises of origin no more than 90 days and no less than 30 days prior to the export of the bovines to the United States, with negative results; and

(ii) The bovines are subjected to an additional individual test for brucellosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results; and

(iii) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines meet the requirements in paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section.

(f) Importation of sexually intact bovines from a Level III region. (1) Sexually intact bovines directly from currently accredited herds for brucellosis. Sexually intact bovines may be imported into the United States for purposes other than immediate slaughter from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis in a Level III region for brucellosis, provided that:

(i) The bovines are subjected to an individual test for brucellosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results; and

(ii) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines originate directly from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis.

(2) Sexually intact bovines that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis. Sexually intact bovines that do not originate directly from a currently accredited herd for brucellosis may be imported into the United States from a Level III region for brucellosis for purposes other than immediate slaughter, provided that:

(i) The bovines originate from a herd that was subjected to two whole herd tests for brucellosis on its premises of origin conducted no less than 9 months and no more than 15 months apart, with the second test taking place no more than 90 days and no less than 30 days prior to the export of the bovines to the United States, with negative results each time; and

(ii) The bovines are subjected to an additional individual test for brucellosis at the port of entry into the United States or during post-arrival quarantine in accordance with § 93.411, with negative results; and

(iii) The bovines are accompanied by a certificate, issued in accordance with § 93.405(a), with an additional statement that the bovines meet the requirements in paragraph (e)(2)(i) of this section.

(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0579-0442) [85 FR 57956, Sept. 17, 2020]