U.S. Code of Federal Regulations

Regulations most recently checked for updates: Jun 30, 2022

§ 181.45 - Goods eligible for full drawback.

(a) Goods originating in Canada or Mexico. A Canadian or Mexican originating good that is dutiable and is imported into the United States is eligible for drawback without regard to the limitation on drawback set forth in § 181.44 of this part if that originating good is:

(1) Subsequently exported to Canada or Mexico;

(2) Used as a material in the production of another good that is subsequently exported to Canada or Mexico; or

(3) Substituted by a good of the same kind and quality and used as a material in the production of another good that is subsequently exported to Canada or Mexico.

Example.Company A imports a dutiable (3 percent rate) Canadian originating good. During Company A's manufacturing process, Company A substitutes a German good of the same kind and quality (on which duty was paid at a 2.5 percent rate) in the production of another good that is subsequently exported to Canada. Company A may designate the dutiable Canadian entry and claim full drawback (99 percent) on the 3 percent duty paid under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b). (Note: NAFTA originating goods will continue to receive full drawback as they cross NAFTA borders for successive stages of production until NAFTA tariffs are fully phased out.)

(b) Claims under 19 U.S.C 1313(j)(1) for goods in same condition. A good imported into the United States and subsequently exported to Canada or Mexico in the same condition is eligible for drawback under 19 U.S.C. 1313(j)(1) without regard to the limitation on drawback set forth in § 181.44 of this part.

Example.X imports a desk into the United States from England and pays $25.00 in duty. X immediately exports the desk to Z in Mexico and Z pays the equivalent of US$10.00 in Mexican duties. X can obtain a refund of 99 percent of the $25.00 paid upon importation of the desk into the United States.

(1) Same condition defined. For purposes of this subpart, a reference to a good in the “same condition” includes a good that has been subjected to any of the following operations provided that no such operation materially alters the characteristics of the good:

(i) Mere dilution with water or another substance;

(ii) Cleaning, including removal of rust, grease, paint or other coatings;

(iii) Application of preservative, including lubricants, protective encapsulation, or preservation paint;

(iv) Trimming, filing, slitting or cutting;

(v) Putting up in measured doses, or packing, repacking, packaging or repackaging; or

(vi) Testing, marking, labelling, sorting or grading.

(2) Commingling of fungible goods - (i) General - (A) Inventory of other than all non-originating goods. Commingling of fungible originating and non-originating goods in inventory is permissable provided that the origin of the goods and the identification of entries for designation for same condition drawback are on the basis of an approved inventory method set forth in the appendix to this part.

(B) Inventory of the non-originating goods. If all goods in a particular inventory are non-originating goods, identification of entries for designation for same condition drawback shall be on the basis of one of the accounting methods in § 190.14 or § 191.14 of this chapter, as appropriate.

(ii) Exception. Agricultural goods imported from Mexico may not be commingled with fungible agricultural goods in the United States for purposes of same condition drawback under this subpart.

(c) Goods not conforming to sample or specifications or shipped without consent of consignee under 19 U.S.C. 1313(c). An imported good exported to Canada or Mexico by reason of failure of the good to conform to sample or specification or by reason of shipment of the good without the consent of the consignee is eligible for drawback under 19 U.S.C. 1313(c) without regard to the limitation on drawback set forth in § 181.44 of this part. Such a good must be exported or destroyed within the statutory 5-year time period and in compliance with the requirements set forth in subpart D of part 190 of this chapter or within the 3-year time period and in compliance with the requirements set forth in subpart D of part 191 of this chapter, as applicable.

Example.X orders, after seeing a sample in the ABC Company's catalog, a certain quantity of 2-by-4 lumber from ABC Company located in Honduras. ABC Company, having run out of the specific lumber, ships instead a different kind of lumber. X rejects the lumber because it did not conform to the sample and is asked to send it to a customer of ABC in Canada. X exports it within 90 days of its release from Customs custody. X may recover 99 percent of the $500 duties it paid to U.S. Customs upon the exportation of the lumber, or $495.00.

(d) Certain goods exported to Canada. Goods identified in Annex 303.6 of the NAFTA and in sections 203(a) (7) and (8) of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act, if exported to Canada, are eligible for drawback without regard to the limitation on drawback set forth in § 181.44 of this part.

[T.D. 95-68, 60 FR 46364, Sept. 6, 1995, as amended by T.D. 98-16, 63 FR 11005, Mar. 5, 1998; USCBP-2018-0029, 83 FR 64996, Dec. 18, 2018]